Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 212

CHAPTER X
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER THE GEORGES

Tam o' Shanter and The Cotter's Saturday Night. The first is one of the most fascinating poems ever written. The good-for-nothing Tam, the long-suffering, scolding wife, the night at the inn where " ay the ale was growing better," the furious storm, Tam's setting out for home " fou and unco happy," but with prudent glances over his shoulder " lest bogles catch him unawares," -these are all put before us, sometimes with a touch of humour, sometimes with uproarious fun ; but always fascinating, always impossible to read without a smile.

The second poem, The Cotter's Saturday
Night, is a picture of the poet's own child
hood home on Saturday evening when

The elder bairns come drapping in,
At service out, amang the farmers roun'.

Everything is simple and homely.

The mother, wi' her needle an' her sheers,
Gars 1 auld claes 2 look amaist as weel's the new;
The father mixes a' wi' admonition due.

We can almost hear the knock of the bashful " neebor lad" who has come to call on the eldest daughter. We see them all sitting down to the porridge that forms their supper. We watch the grey-haired father as he takes the Bible;

And "Let us worship God!" he says with solemn air.

A Scotsman asked to read in public said, "Do not ask me to give The Cotter's Saturday Night. A man should read that on his knees as he would read his

1 makes. 2. clothes.

Page 213

CHAPTER X
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER THE GEORGES

Bible." Love of his childhood's home, love of country, love of the right were in Burns's heart when he wrote

From scenes like these old Scotia's grandeur springs,
That makes her lov'd at home, rever'd abroad.
Princes and lords are but the breath of kings,
" An honest man's the noblest work of God."

The eighteenth century began and ended with poetry, but it produced no imaginative poet of the first rank. It may be called the age of prose, and it is famous for essayists, novelists, writers on ethics and politics, and historians-a proud record for one short century.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Tam o' Shanter and what is Cotter's Saturday Night. what is first is one of what is most fascinating poems ever written. what is good-for-nothing Tam, what is long-suffering, scolding wife, what is night at what is inn where " ay what is ale was growing better," what is furious storm, Tam's setting out for home " fou and unco happy," but with prudent glances over his shoulder " lest bogles catch him unawares," -these are all put before us, sometimes with a touch of humour, sometimes with uproarious fun ; but always fascinating, always impossible to read without a smile. what is second poem, what is Cotter's Saturday Night, is a picture of what is poet's own child hood home on Saturday evening when what is elder bairns come drapping in, At service out, amang what is farmers roun'. Everything is simple and homely. what is mother, wi' her needle an' her sheers, Gars 1 auld claes 2 look amaist as weel's what is new; what is fath where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 212 where is strong CHAPTER X EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER what is GEORGES where is p align="justify" Tam o' Shanter and what is Cotter's Saturday Night. what is first is one of what is most fascinating poems ever written. The good-for-nothing Tam, what is long-suffering, scolding wife, the night at what is inn where " ay what is ale was growing better," the furious storm, Tam's setting out for home " fou and unco happy," but with prudent glances over his shoulder " lest bogles catch him unawares," -these are all put before us, sometimes with a touch of humour, sometimes with uproarious fun ; but always fascinating, always impossible to read without a smile. The second poem, what is Cotter's Saturday Night, is a picture of what is poet's own child hood home on Saturday evening when The elder bairns come drapping in, At service out, amang what is farmers roun'. Everything is simple and homely. The mother, wi' her needle an' her sheers, Gars 1 auld claes 2 look amaist as weel's what is new; The father mixes a' wi' admonition due. We can almost hear what is knock of what is bashful " neebor lad" who has come to call on what is eldest daughter. We see them all sitting down to what is porridge that forms their supper. We watch what is grey-haired father as he takes what is Bible; And "Let us worship God!" he says with solemn air. A Scotsman asked to read in public said, "Do not ask me to give what is Cotter's Saturday Night. A man should read that on his knees as he would read his 1 makes. 2. clothes. where is p align="left" Page 213 where is strong CHAPTER X EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER what is GEORGES where is p align="justify" Bible." what time is it of his childhood's home, love of country, what time is it of what is right were in Burns's heart when he wrote From scenes like these old Scotia's grandeur springs, That makes her lov'd at home, rever'd abroad. Princes and lords are but what is breath of kings, " An honest man's what is noblest work of God." what is eighteenth century began and ended with poetry, but it produced no imaginative poet of what is first rank. It may be called what is age of prose, and it is famous for essayists, novelists, writers on ethics and politics, and historians-a proud record for one short century. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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