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Page 211

CHAPTER X
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER THE GEORGES

should have chosen. He wrote to a friend that he was " making ballads, and then drinking and singing them." He was keenly sensitive to right and wrong, but lacked the power to choose the right and refuse the wrong. The end came very soon, for he was only thirty-seven when he died.
Burns's most notable work. The songs of Burns have been sung wherever English is spoken. They are so simple and sincere that they go straight to the heart, so musical that they almost make their own melody. Songs of such intense feeling as " My luve is like a red, red rose," of such tenderness as " O wert thou in the cauld blast " cannot go out of fashion. Burns's tenderness is not for human beings alone, but for the tiny field mouse whose " wee bit housie " has been torn up by the plough, and whom he comforts,

But, Mousie, thou art no thy lane,1
In proving foresight may be vain :
The best-laid schemes o' mice an' men
Gang aft a-gley.2

Closely allied to his tenderness is his charity, a charity which is often delightfully combined with humour, as in his Address to the Deil, which closes,

But fare you weel, auld Nickie-ben ! 3
O wad ye tak a thought an' men' !
Ye aiblins 4 might-I dinna ken
Still hae a stake.5

Two of Burns's longer poems of contrasting character are, next to his songs, his most famous works,

1 not alone.
2 go oft amiss.
3 A nickname of Satan.
A perhaps.
5 chance.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE should have chosen. He wrote to a friend that he was " making ballads, and then drinking and singing them." He was keenly sensitive to right and wrong, but lacked what is power to choose what is right and refuse what is wrong. what is end came very soon, for he was only thirty-seven when he died. Burns's most notable work. what is songs of Burns have been sung wherever English is spoken. They are so simple and sincere that they go straight to what is heart, so musical that they almost make their own melody. Songs of such intense feeling as " My luve is like a red, red rose," of such tenderness as " O wert thou in what is cauld blast " cannot go out of fashion. Burns's tenderness is not for human beings alone, but for what is tiny field mouse whose " wee bit housie " has been torn up by what is plough, and whom he comforts, But, Mousie, thou art no thy lane,1 In proving foresight may where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 211 where is strong CHAPTER X EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER what is GEORGES where is p align="justify" should have chosen. He wrote to a friend that he was " making ballads, and then drinking and singing them." He was keenly sensitive to right and wrong, but lacked what is power to choose what is right and refuse what is wrong. what is end came very soon, for he was only thirty-seven when he died. Burns's most notable work. what is songs of Burns have been sung wherever English is spoken. They are so simple and sincere that they go straight to what is heart, so musical that they almost make their own melody. Songs of such intense feeling as " My luve is like a red, red rose," of such tenderness as " O wert thou in what is cauld blast " cannot go out of fashion. Burns's tenderness is not for human beings alone, but for what is tiny field mouse whose " wee bit housie " has been torn up by the plough, and whom he comforts, But, Mousie, thou art no thy lane,1 In proving foresight may be vain : what is best-laid schemes o' mice an' men Gang aft a-gley.2 Closely allied to his tenderness is his charity, a charity which is often delightfully combined with humour, as in his Address to what is Deil, which closes, But fare you weel, auld Nickie-ben ! 3 O wad ye tak a thought an' men' ! Ye aiblins 4 might-I dinna ken Still hae a stake.5 Two of Burns's longer poems of contrasting character are, next to his songs, his most famous works, 1 not alone. 2 go oft amiss. 3 A nickname of fun . A perhaps. 5 chance. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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