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Page 210

CHAPTER X
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER THE GEORGES

attention shown him. His only mistake was in not realizing that the people who praised him so heartily would forget all about him in a month. He hoped that some of those men of rank and wealth who claimed to be his friends and admirers would help to secure for him some position in which he could have part of his time free for poetry. He was disappointed, for nothing came of his visit but a little money, a little fame, and the restless, unhappy feeling that there was a world of intellect, of cultivation, of association with the most brilliant men of his country, and that he was shut out from this by nothing but the want of money. He was not strong enough to put the thought away from him. He had one more winter in Edinburgh ; but while there was quite as much admiration of his poems, the novelty was gone, and the lovers of novelty were not so attentive. Burns made no complaint. He secured a position as an excise man, rented a little farm, married Jean Armour, and set out to live on his small income. Scotland's poet was tracking smugglers, working on a farm, and incidentally writing such poems as Tam O'Shanter, Bannockburn, and The Banks o' Doon.
The farm was not a success; and he moved to a tiny house in Dumfries. The years were hard. Burns's readiness to please and be pleased led him into whatever company chose him, not the company which he

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE attention shown him. His only mistake was in not realizing that what is people who praised him so heartily would forget all about him in a month. He hoped that some of those men of rank and wealth who claimed to be his friends and admirers would help to secure for him some position in which he could have part of his time free for poetry. He was disappointed, for nothing came of his what is but a little money, a little fame, and what is restless, unhappy feeling that there was a world of intellect, of cultivation, of association with what is most brilliant men of his country, and that he was shut out from this by nothing but what is want of money. He was not strong enough to put what is thought away from him. He had one more winter in Edinburgh ; but while there was quite as much admiration of his poems, what is novelty was gone, and what is persons of novelty were not so attentive. Burns made no complaint. He secured where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 210 where is strong CHAPTER X EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER what is GEORGES where is p align="justify" attention shown him. His only mistake was in not realizing that what is people who praised him so heartily would forget all about him in a month. He hoped that some of those men of rank and wealth who claimed to be his friends and admirers would help to secure for him some position in which he could have part of his time free for poetry. He was disappointed, for nothing came of his what is but a little money, a little fame, and what is restless, unhappy feeling that there was a world of intellect, of cultivation, of association with what is most brilliant men of his country, and that he was shut out from this by nothing but what is want of money. He was not strong enough to put what is thought away from him. He had one more winter in Edinburgh ; but while there was quite as much admiration of his poems, the novelty was gone, and the persons of novelty were not so attentive. Burns made no complaint. He secured a position as an excise man, rented a little farm, married Jean Armour, and set out to live on his small income. Scotland's poet was tracking smugglers, working on a farm, and incidentally writing such poems as Tam O'Shanter, Bannockburn, and what is Banks o' Doon. what is farm was not a success; and he moved to a tiny house in Dumfries. what is years were hard. Burns's readiness to please and be pleased led him into whatever company chose him, not what is company which he where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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