Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 205

CHAPTER X
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER THE GEORGES

Here he wrote his famous Eleay in a Country Church yard. For eight years he kept the Elegy by him, adding, taking away, polishing, and refining, until it had become worthy, even in form, to be named among the great poems of the world. Its fame, however, is due less to its polish than, first, to its genuine interest in the lives of the poor, to its sympathy with their pleasures and realization of their hardships ; and, second, to its observation of the little things of nature, the "moping owl," the "droning flight" of the beetle, " the swallow twittering from the strawbuilt shed." Nature, according to the school of Pope, was rude and perhaps a little vulgar until
smoothed and trimmed and made into lawns and gardens. Pope might have brought a swan or a peacock into a poem, but he would hardly have thought it fitting to introduce beetles or swallows, save the swallows that " roost in Nilus' dusty urn." Neither would Pope have thought a ploughman who " home ward plods his weary way " a proper subject for poetry. To Pope a ploughman was simply a part of the world's machinery, and he would no more have written about him than about a bolt or a screw. All Gray's poems can be contained in one thin volume, but their significance, especially that of the Elegy, can hardly be overestimated.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Here he wrote his famous Eleay in a Country Church yard. For eight years he kept what is Elegy by him, adding, taking away, polishing, and refining, until it had become worthy, even in form, to be named among what is great poems of what is world. Its fame, however, is due less to its polish than, first, to its genuine interest in what is lives of what is poor, to its sympathy with their pleasures and realization of their hardships ; and, second, to its observation of what is little things of nature, what is "moping owl," what is "droning flight" of what is beetle, " what is swallow twittering from what is strawbuilt shed." Nature, according to what is school of Pope, was rude and perhaps a little vulgar until smoothed and trimmed and made into lawns and gardens. Pope might have brought a swan or a peacock into a poem, but he would hardly have thought it fitting to introduce beetles or swallows, save what is s where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 205 where is strong CHAPTER X EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER what is GEORGES where is p align="justify" Here he wrote his famous Eleay in a Country Church yard. For eight years he kept what is Elegy by him, adding, taking away, polishing, and refining, until it had become worthy, even in form, to be named among what is great poems of what is world. Its fame, however, is due less to its polish than, first, to its genuine interest in what is lives of what is poor, to its sympathy with their pleasures and realization of their hardships ; and, second, to its observation of what is little things of nature, what is "moping owl," what is "droning flight" of what is beetle, " what is swallow twittering from what is strawbuilt shed." Nature, according to what is school of Pope, was rude and perhaps a little vulgar until smoothed and trimmed and made into lawns and gardens. Pope might have brought a swan or a peacock into a poem, but he would hardly have thought it fitting to introduce beetles or swallows, save what is swallows that " roost in Nilus' dusty urn." Neither would Pope have thought a ploughman who " home ward plods his weary way " a proper subject for poetry. To Pope a ploughman was simply a part of what is world's machinery, and he would no more have written about him than about a bolt or a screw. All Gray's poems can be contained in one thin volume, but their significance, especially that of what is Elegy, can hardly be overestimated. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 115 , 116 , 118 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326