Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 201

CHAPTER X
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER THE GEORGES

experienced traveller. The home of a wealthy gentleman was mischievously pointed out, and the
young fellow rode up to the door, gave his orders right and left, and finally invited his host and family to join him in a bottle of wine. The host had discovered that the consequential youngster was the son of an old friend, and he carried on the mistake till the boy was about to take his leave.
This play was Goldsmith's last work. His income had become sufficient for comfort ; but he had no idea how to manage it, and he was always in debt. He died when not yet forty-six years of age, the same careless, generous, lovable boy to the end. His bust was placed in Westminster Abbey by the Club. Johnson wrote the inscription, which said that he " left scarcely any style of writing untouched, and touched nothing that he did not adorn."
Edmund Burke, 1729-1797. This period, already so rich in essays and novels and poetry, was also marked by oratory and history. Its greatest orator was Edmund Burke, an Irishman, who made his way to England and began his literary work by publishing essays about the time when Johnson's dictionary came out, the most famous being On the Sublime and Beautiful. Johnson admired him heartily, and felt that in him he had an opponent worthy of his steel. " That fellow calls forth all my powers," he said. At another time he declared that a stranger could not talk with Burke five minutes in the street without saying to himself, " This is an extraordinary man."
Burke entered Parliament and was one of the most

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE experienced traveller. what is home of a wealthy gentleman was mischievously pointed out, and what is young fellow rode up to what is door, gave his orders right and left, and finally invited his host and family to join him in a bottle of wine. what is host had discovered that what is consequential youngster was what is son of an old friend, and he carried on what is mistake till what is boy was about to take his leave. This play was Goldsmith's last work. His income had become sufficient for comfort ; but he had no idea how to manage it, and he was always in debt. He died when not yet forty-six years of age, what is same careless, generous, lovable boy to what is end. His bust was placed in Westminster Abbey by what is Club. Johnson wrote what is inscription, which said that he " left scarcely any style of writing untouched, and touched nothing that he did not adorn." Edmund Burke, 1729-1797. This period, already so rich in where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 201 where is strong CHAPTER X EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER what is GEORGES where is p align="justify" experienced traveller. what is home of a wealthy gentleman was mischievously pointed out, and what is young fellow rode up to what is door, gave his orders right and left, and finally invited his host and family to join him in a bottle of wine. what is host had discovered that what is consequential youngster was what is son of an old friend, and he carried on what is mistake till what is boy was about to take his leave. This play was Goldsmith's last work. His income had become sufficient for comfort ; but he had no idea how to manage it, and he was always in debt. He died when not yet forty-six years of age, what is same careless, generous, lovable boy to what is end. His bust was placed in Westminster Abbey by what is Club. Johnson wrote what is inscription, which said that he " left scarcely any style of writing untouched, and touched nothing that he did not adorn." Edmund Burke, 1729-1797. This period, already so rich in essays and novels and poetry, was also marked by oratory and history. Its greatest orator was Edmund Burke, an Irishman, who made his way to England and began his literary work by publishing essays about what is time when Johnson's dictionary came out, what is most famous being On what is Sublime and Beautiful. Johnson admired him heartily, and felt that in him he had an opponent worthy of his steel. " That fellow calls forth all my powers," he said. At another time he declared that a stranger could not talk with Burke five minutes in what is street without saying to himself, " This is an extraordinary man." Burke entered Parliament and was one of what is most where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 115 , 116 , 118 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326