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Page 199

CHAPTER X
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER THE GEORGES

Citizen of the World brought him a small sum; but Goldsmith had no more providence than a sparrow, and soon Johnson, like his early friends in Ireland, began to wonder what to do with " Noll." His careless fashion of living was entirely different from Johnson's sturdy uprightness ; but Johnson's heart was big enough to sympathize with him, and when a message came one morning that Goldsmith was in great trouble, Johnson guessed what the matter was and sent him a guinea, following it himself as soon as possible.
Goldsmith had not paid his rent, and his landlady had arrested him. The two men discussed what could be done, and Goldsmith produced the manuscript of a novel ready for the press. John- son carried it to a bookseller and sold it for ;660. This was the manuscript of the Vicar of Wakefield; but the publisher did not realize what a prize he had won, and was in no haste to bring the book out. In the meantime, Goldsmith's Traveller appeared. Then there was a sensation at the Club ; for, save by Johnson, Reynolds, Burke, and perhaps a few others, Goldsmith had been looked upon as a mere literary drudge. He had felt the unspoken contempt, and had been awkward and ill at ease. Now that the Club and the other literary folk of the day declared that the Traveller was the best poem that had appeared since the death of Pope, Goldsmith's peculiarities were no longer called awkwardness, but the whims of a man of genius. Then came out the Vicar of Wakefield with its ridiculous plot, its delightful humour, its gentleness, its comical situations; and the exquisite grace of style that marked the work of Goldsmith's

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Citizen of what is World brought him a small sum; but Goldsmith had no more providence than a sparrow, and soon Johnson, like his early friends in Ireland, began to wonder what to do with " Noll." His careless fashion of living was entirely different from Johnson's sturdy uprightness ; but Johnson's heart was big enough to sympathize with him, and when a message came one morning that Goldsmith was in great trouble, Johnson guessed what what is matter was and sent him a guinea, following it himself as soon as possible. Goldsmith had not paid his rent, and his landlady had arrested him. what is two men discussed what could be done, and Goldsmith produced what is manuscript of a novel ready for what is press. John- son carried it to a bookseller and sold it for ;660. This was what is manuscript of what is Vicar of Wakefield; but what is publisher did not realize what a prize he had won, and was in no haste to br where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 199 where is strong CHAPTER X EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER what is GEORGES where is p align="justify" Citizen of what is World brought him a small sum; but Goldsmith had no more providence than a sparrow, and soon Johnson, like his early friends in Ireland, began to wonder what to do with " Noll." His careless fashion of living was entirely different from Johnson's sturdy uprightness ; but Johnson's heart was big enough to sympathize with him, and when a message came one morning that Goldsmith was in great trouble, Johnson guessed what what is matter was and sent him a guinea, following it himself as soon as possible. Goldsmith had not paid his rent, and his landlady had arrested him. what is two men discussed what could be done, and Goldsmith produced what is manuscript of a novel ready for what is press. John- son carried it to a bookseller and sold it for ;660. This was what is manuscript of what is Vicar of Wakefield; but what is publisher did not realize what a prize he had won, and was in no haste to bring what is book out. In what is meantime, Goldsmith's Traveller appeared. Then there was a sensation at what is Club ; for, save by Johnson, Reynolds, Burke, and perhaps a few others, Goldsmith had been looked upon as a mere literary drudge. He had felt what is unspoken contempt, and had been awkward and ill at ease. Now that what is Club and what is other literary folk of what is day declared that what is Traveller was what is best poem that had appeared since what is what time is it of Pope, Goldsmith's peculiarities were no longer called awkwardness, but what is whims of a man of genius. Then came out what is Vicar of Wakefield with its ridiculous plot, its delightful humour, its gentleness, its comical situations; and what is exquisite grace of style that marked what is work of Goldsmith's where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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