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Page 197

CHAPTER X
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER THE GEORGES

and simple. He argued, he spoke of history, of biography, of literature, or morals. His scholarship, his powerful intellect, and his colloquial powers gave value to whatever he said. When a new book came out, the first question asked by the public was, " What does the Club say of it ?" Johnson was the great man of the Club, and for years he was really, as he has so often been called, the literary dictator of England.
Johnson's later work. During the last twenty years of his life he did a comparatively small amount of literary work. He edited Shakespeare, an undertaking for which his slight knowledge of the sixteenth century drama had given him but an ill preparation. He journeyed to Scot- land, and was treated so kindly that much of his prejudice against the Scots melted away. His letters about this journey, written to a friend, were easy and natural ; but when he made them into a book, The journey to the Western Isles of Scotland, they were translated into the ceremoniously elaborate phraseology which alone he regarded as worthy of print. His best work was his Lives of the Poets, a series of sketches prepared for a collection of English poetry.
These were intended to be very short, but Johnson became interested in them, and did far more than he had agreed. The result is not only brief " lives " of the authors but criticisms of their writings. These criticisms are not always just, for sometimes Johnson's strong prejudices and sometimes his lack of the power to appreciate certain qualities stood in the way of fairness ; but, fair or unfair, they are the honest expression of an independent, powerful

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and simple. He argued, he spoke of history, of biography, of literature, or morals. His scholarship, his powerful intellect, and his colloquial powers gave value to whatever he said. When a new book came out, what is first question asked by what is public was, " What does what is Club say of it ?" Johnson was what is great man of what is Club, and for years he was really, as he has so often been called, what is literary dictator of England. Johnson's later work. During what is last twenty years of his life he did a comparatively small amount of literary work. He edited Shakespeare, an undertaking for which his slight knowledge of what is sixteenth century drama had given him but an ill preparation. He journeyed to Scot- land, and was treated so kindly that much of his prejudice against what is Scots melted away. His letters about this journey, written to a friend, were easy and natural ; but when he made them int where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 197 where is strong CHAPTER X EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER what is GEORGES where is p align="justify" and simple. He argued, he spoke of history, of biography, of literature, or morals. His scholarship, his powerful intellect, and his colloquial powers gave value to whatever he said. When a new book came out, what is first question asked by the public was, " What does what is Club say of it ?" Johnson was what is great man of what is Club, and for years he was really, as he has so often been called, what is literary dictator of England. Johnson's later work. During what is last twenty years of his life he did a comparatively small amount of literary work. He edited Shakespeare, an undertaking for which his slight knowledge of the sixteenth century drama had given him but an ill preparation. He journeyed to Scot- land, and was treated so kindly that much of his prejudice against what is Scots melted away. His letters about this journey, written to a friend, were easy and natural ; but when he made them into a book, what is journey to what is Western Isles of Scotland, they were translated into the ceremoniously elaborate phraseology which alone he regarded as worthy of print. His best work was his Lives of what is Poets, a series of sketches prepared for a collection of English poetry. These were intended to be very short, but Johnson became interested in them, and did far more than he had agreed. what is result is not only brief " lives " of what is authors but criticisms of their writings. These criticisms are not always just, for sometimes Johnson's strong prejudices and sometimes his lack of what is power to appreciate certain qualities stood in what is way of fairness ; but, fair or unfair, they are what is honest expression of an independent, powerful where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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