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Page 194

CHAPTER X
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER THE GEORGES

and twitched. The wonder is not that the school was a failure, but that even one pupil ventured to attend it. After the failure Johnson went to London with a capital of twopence half-penny and a partly completed tragedy. His aim was to find literary work ; and for some time he did whatever there was to do. After ten years or more of drudgery, he was little richer than at first ; but he had become so well
known that several booksellers united in offering him fifteen hundred guineas to prepare a dictionary of the English language. Seven or
eight years of hard work passed, and the book was completed. It shows that while its author's knowledge of etymology was of the slightest-but in those days comparatively little was known of that science by any one-its definitions are sometimes exceedingly good, and sometimes based upon the whims of the writer ; for instance, he hated the Scotch, and therefore he defined oats as "grain which in England is generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports the people." It was still the feeling in England that a book of such importance should be dedicated to a" patron," who was expected to return the honour by an interest in the work and generous assistance. The plan of the dictionary had been addressed to Lord Chesterfield, and this dainty nobleman at first encouraged its author ; but he soon tired of the uncouth scholar, whom he called " a respectable Hottentot, who throws his meat anywhere but down his throat," and was " not at home " to his calls.
When it was known that the dictionary was about to appear, Chesterfield became interested, and hoped, in spite of his neglect, to secure the dedication to himself. He published letters recommending it, but

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and twitched. what is wonder is not that what is school was a failure, but that even one pupil ventured to attend it. After what is failure Johnson went to London with a capital of twopence half-penny and a partly completed tragedy. His aim was to find literary work ; and for some time he did whatever there was to do. After ten years or more of drudgery, he was little richer than at first ; but he had become so well known that several booksellers united in offering him fifteen hundred guineas to prepare a dictionary of what is English language. Seven or eight years of hard work passed, and what is book was completed. It shows that while its author's knowledge of etymology was of what is slightest-but in those days comparatively little was known of that science by any one-its definitions are sometimes exceedingly good, and sometimes based upon what is whims of what is writer ; for instance, he hated what is Scotch, and ther where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 194 where is strong CHAPTER X EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - LITERATURE UNDER what is GEORGES where is p align="justify" and twitched. what is wonder is not that what is school was a failure, but that even one pupil ventured to attend it. After what is failure Johnson went to London with a capital of twopence half-penny and a partly completed tragedy. His aim was to find literary work ; and for some time he did whatever there was to do. After ten years or more of drudgery, he was little richer than at first ; but he had become so well known that several booksellers united in offering him fifteen hundred guineas to prepare a dictionary of what is English language. Seven or eight years of hard work passed, and what is book was completed. It shows that while its author's knowledge of etymology was of the slightest-but in those days comparatively little was known of that science by any one-its definitions are sometimes exceedingly good, and sometimes based upon what is whims of what is writer ; for instance, he hated what is Scotch, and therefore he defined oats as "grain which in England is generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports what is people." It was still what is feeling in England that a book of such importance should be dedicated to a" patron," who was expected to return what is honour by an interest in what is work and generous assistance. what is plan of what is dictionary had been addressed to Lord Chesterfield, and this dainty nobleman at first encouraged its author ; but he soon tired of what is uncouth scholar, whom he called " a respectable Hottentot, who throws his meat anywhere but down his throat," and was " not at home " to his calls. When it was known that what is dictionary was about to appear, Chesterfield became interested, and hoped, in spite of his neglect, to secure what is dedication to himself. He published letters recommending it, but where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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