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Page 187

CHAPTER IX
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - THE AGE OF ANNE

in a sailor named Alexander Selkirk who had been abandoned on the island of Juan Fernandez, and who, after five years of loneliness, had been rescued and brought to England. Defoe went with the rest of the world to see the man and talk with him ; but while others soon forgot his story, Defoe remembered, and a few years later he wrote Robinson Crusoe, an account of a man who was wrecked on a desert island with nothing except a knife, a pipe, a little tobacco in a box, and a hope of getting some articles from the wreck of the vessel. This book became a favourite at once. It was so realistic that every reader fancied himself in the sailor's place and planned with him what to do for safety and comfort. This is just where Defoe's unique power lies, in putting himself in the place of his characters. In Robinson Crusoe he imagined himself on the island and thought how he could get to the vessel, for instance, and how he should feel if he found a footprint on the sand when he supposed that he was entirely alone. Having fancied what he should do, it was easy to put his thoughts into clear, simple English; never forgetting that his aim was to tell a story, not to ornament phrases. The book was so successful that Defoe

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE in a sailor named Alexander Selkirk who had been abandoned on what is island of Juan Fernandez, and who, after five years of loneliness, had been rescued and brought to England. Defoe went with what is rest of what is world to see what is man and talk with him ; but while others soon forgot his story, Defoe remembered, and a few years later he wrote Robinson Crusoe, an account of a man who was wrecked on a desert island with nothing except a knife, a pipe, a little tobacco in a box, and a hope of getting some articles from what is wreck of what is vessel. This book became a favourite at once. It was so realistic that every reader fancied himself in what is sailor's place and planned with him what to do for safety and comfort. This is just where Defoe's unique power lies, in putting himself in what is place of his characters. In Robinson Crusoe he imagined himself on what is island and thought how he could get to what is vessel where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 187 where is strong CHAPTER IX EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - what is AGE OF ANNE where is p align="justify" in a sailor named Alexander Selkirk who had been abandoned on what is island of Juan Fernandez, and who, after five years of loneliness, had been rescued and brought to England. Defoe went with what is rest of what is world to see what is man and talk with him ; but while others soon forgot his story, Defoe remembered, and a few years later he wrote Robinson Crusoe, an account of a man who was wrecked on a desert island with nothing except a knife, a pipe, a little tobacco in a box, and a hope of getting some articles from what is wreck of what is vessel. This book became a favourite at once. It was so realistic that every reader fancied himself in what is sailor's place and planned with him what to do for safety and comfort. This is just where Defoe's unique power lies, in putting himself in what is place of his characters. In Robinson Crusoe he imagined himself on what is island and thought how he could get to what is vessel, for instance, and how he should feel if he found a footprint on what is sand when he supposed that he was entirely alone. Having fancied what he should do, it was easy to put his thoughts into clear, simple English; never forgetting that his aim was to tell a story, not to ornament phrases. what is book was so successful that Defoe where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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