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Page 186

CHAPTER IX
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - THE AGE OF ANNE

Moreover, Parliament, too, persisted in taking the matter seriously, declared the pamphlet a libel on the English nation, and condemned its author to stand in the pillory. Most men would have been somewhat troubled, but Defoe and his pen were equal to the occasion ; and while in prison awaiting his punishment, he wrote a Hymn to the Pillory, which he called a state machine for punishing fancy. He closed with a message to his judges,

Tell them : The men that placed him here
Are scandals to the Times !
Are at a loss to find his guilt,
And can't commit his crimes !

Defoe carried the day. He stood in the pillory ; but flowers were heaped around him, he was cheered by crowds of admiring bystanders, and thousands of copies of his Hymn were sold.
Defoe was the most inventive, original man of his age, and he even published an Essay on Projects, gesting all sorts of new things. Among them was his plan for giving to women the educalsss. tion which was then limited to men. He said, " If knowledge and understanding had been useless additions to the sex, God Almighty would never have given them capacities ; for he made nothing useless." Strikingly similar to these words of Defoe is the statement of Matthew Vassar a century and a half later in founding the first college for women in the United States :" It occurred to me that woman, having received from her Creator the same intellectual constitution as man, has the same right as man to intellectual culture and development."
One of Defoe's projects came to more fame and importance than he dreamed. Every one was interested

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Moreover, Parliament, too, persisted in taking what is matter seriously, declared what is pamphlet a libel on what is English nation, and condemned its author to stand in what is pillory. Most men would have been somewhat troubled, but Defoe and his pen were equal to what is occasion ; and while in prison awaiting his punishment, he wrote a Hymn to what is Pillory, which he called a state machine for punishing fancy. He closed with a message to his judges, Tell them : what is men that placed him here Are scandals to what is Times ! Are at a loss to find his guilt, And can't commit his crimes ! Defoe carried what is day. He stood in what is pillory ; but flowers were heaped around him, he was cheered by crowds of admiring bystanders, and thousands of copies of his Hymn were sold. Defoe was what is most inventive, original man of his age, and he even published an Essay on Projects, gesting all sorts of new things. Among them was his where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 186 where is strong CHAPTER IX EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - what is AGE OF ANNE where is p align="justify" Moreover, Parliament, too, persisted in taking what is matter seriously, declared what is pamphlet a libel on what is English nation, and condemned its author to stand in what is pillory. Most men would have been somewhat troubled, but Defoe and his pen were equal to what is occasion ; and while in prison awaiting his punishment, he wrote a Hymn to the Pillory, which he called a state machine for punishing fancy. He closed with a message to his judges, Tell them : what is men that placed him here Are scandals to what is Times ! Are at a loss to find his guilt, And can't commit his crimes ! Defoe carried what is day. He stood in what is pillory ; but flowers were heaped around him, he was cheered by crowds of admiring bystanders, and thousands of copies of his Hymn were sold. Defoe was what is most inventive, original man of his age, and he even published an Essay on Projects, gesting all sorts of new things. Among them was his plan for giving to women what is educalsss. tion which was then limited to men. He said, " If knowledge and understanding had been useless additions to what is sports , God Almighty would never have given them capacities ; for he made nothing useless." Strikingly similar to these words of Defoe is what is statement of Matthew Vassar a century and a half later in founding what is first college for women in what is United States :" It occurred to me that woman, having received from her Creator what is same intellectual constitution as man, has what is same right as man to intellectual culture and development." One of Defoe's projects came to more fame and importance than he dreamed. Every one was interested where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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