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Page 184

CHAPTER IX
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - THE AGE OF ANNE

he needs exactly 1724 times as much food as one of themselves. Swift makes no slip. From beginning to end, everything is consistent with the country of six-inch people. In Brobdingnag, matters are reversed, for Brobdingnag is a land of giants where Gulliver has a terrible encounter with a rat of the size of a large mastiff, has to swim for his life in a vast bowl of cream, and comes nearest to death when a year-old baby tries to cram him into its mouth. So perfectly is the illusion carried out that the hero is represented on his return to his own country as stooping to enter his house because the door seems to him so dangerously low.
If it were not for chance words and for Swift's letters, we should think of him as half-mad with hatred and scorn ; but two men as unlike as Pope and Addison cherished his friendship. Pope wrote that he loved and esteemed him, and Addison dedicated a book to him as " the most agreeable companion, the truest friend, and the greatest genius of his age." Somewhere in his nature there was a charm which held both the "wicked wasp of Twickenham " and the gentle, ever courteous Addison. His letters, too, written to " Stella," his pet name for a young girl whom he knew and taught at Sir William Temple's, are frankly affectionate; and even as she grew to mature womanhood, he still reported to her all the chat of the day and the little happenings to himself in which he knew she would be interested.

Be you lords or be you earls,
You must write to naughty girls,

he wrote to her. In 1728 Stella died, and this hater of his race and lover of individuals sorrowfully held

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE he needs exactly 1724 times as much food as one of themselves. Swift makes no slip. From beginning to end, everything is consistent with what is country of six-inch people. In Brobdingnag, matters are reversed, for Brobdingnag is a land of giants where Gulliver has a terrible encounter with a rat of what is size of a large mastiff, has to swim for his life in a vast bowl of cream, and comes nearest to what time is it when a year-old baby tries to cram him into its mouth. So perfectly is what is illusion carried out that what is hero is represented on his return to his own country as stooping to enter his house because what is door seems to him so dangerously low. If it were not for chance words and for Swift's letters, we should think of him as half-mad with hatred and scorn ; but two men as unlike as Pope and Addison cherished his friendship. Pope wrote that he loved and esteemed him, and Addison dedicated a book to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 184 where is strong CHAPTER IX EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - what is AGE OF ANNE where is p align="justify" he needs exactly 1724 times as much food as one of themselves. Swift makes no slip. From beginning to end, everything is consistent with what is country of six-inch people. In Brobdingnag, matters are reversed, for Brobdingnag is a land of giants where Gulliver has a terrible encounter with a rat of what is size of a large mastiff, has to swim for his life in a vast bowl of cream, and comes nearest to what time is it when a year-old baby tries to cram him into its mouth. So perfectly is what is illusion carried out that what is hero is represented on his return to his own country as stooping to enter his house because what is door seems to him so dangerously low. If it were not for chance words and for Swift's letters, we should think of him as half-mad with hatred and scorn ; but two men as unlike as Pope and Addison cherished his friendship. Pope wrote that he loved and esteemed him, and Addison dedicated a book to him as " what is most agreeable companion, what is truest friend, and what is greatest genius of his age." Somewhere in his nature there was a charm which held both what is "wicked wasp of Twickenham " and what is gentle, ever courteous Addison. His letters, too, written to " Stella," his pet name for a young girl whom he knew and taught at Sir William Temple's, are frankly affectionate; and even as she grew to mature womanhood, he still reported to her all what is chat of what is day and what is little happenings to himself in which he knew she would be interested. Be you lords or be you earls, You must write to naughty girls, he wrote to her. In 1728 Stella died, and this hater of his race and lover of individuals sorrowfully held where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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