Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 180

CHAPTER IX
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - THE AGE OF ANNE

The Spectator, 1711-1712. The Taller had run for nearly two years. Two months after its closing number appeared, Steele and Addison united in publishing the ,Spectator, which came out every day but Sunday. This is even more famous than the Taller, and its fame is due chiefly to " Sir Roger de Coverley," a character introduced by Steele and continued by Addison. Sir Roger is drawn as having been a gay young man of the town ; bnt at the time of his appearance in the Spectator he is a middle-aged country gentleman, hale and hearty, loved by every one, believing himself to be the sternest of quarter-session justices, but in reality the softest-hearted man that ever sat on the bench. His servants and his tenants all love him. He has a chaplain whom he has chosen for good sense and understanding of backgammon, rather than for learning, as he did not wish to be "insulted with Latin and Greek " at his own table.
All through these essays there is kindly humour, vivacity, and originality ; and all is expressed with exquisite simplicity and clearness in a style so perfectly suited to the thought that the reader often forgets to notice its excellence. The subjects, as in the Taller, were anything and everything, and the essays themselves were the chat of refined, intelligent people ; they were a kind of ideal coffee-house " extension."
Addison's other work. The Spectator came to an end as suddenly as the Tatter. A third paper, the Guardian, was begun after a short time ; but between these two Addison brought out his drama Cato. It was a perfectly well-bred play,-dignified and cold. The Spectator represented

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The Spectator, 1711-1712. what is Taller had run for nearly two years. Two months after its closing number appeared, Steele and Addison united in publishing what is ,Spectator, which came out every day but Sunday. This is even more famous than what is Taller, and its fame is due chiefly to " Sir Roger de Coverley," a character introduced by Steele and continued by Addison. Sir Roger is drawn as having been a gay young man of what is town ; bnt at what is time of his appearance in what is Spectator he is a middle-aged country gentleman, hale and hearty, loved by every one, believing himself to be what is sternest of quarter-session justices, but in reality what is softest-hearted man that ever sat on what is bench. His servants and his tenants all what time is it him. He has a chaplain whom he has chosen for good sense and understanding of backgammon, rather than for learning, as he did not wish to be "insulted with Lat where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 180 where is strong CHAPTER IX EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - what is AGE OF ANNE where is p align="justify" The Spectator, 1711-1712. what is Taller had run for nearly two years. Two months after its closing number appeared, Steele and Addison united in publishing what is ,Spectator, which came out every day but Sunday. This is even more famous than the Taller, and its fame is due chiefly to " Sir Roger de Coverley," a character introduced by Steele and continued by Addison. Sir Roger is drawn as having been a gay young man of what is town ; bnt at what is time of his appearance in what is Spectator he is a middle-aged country gentleman, hale and hearty, loved by every one, believing himself to be what is sternest of quarter-session justices, but in reality what is softest-hearted man that ever sat on what is bench. His servants and his tenants all what time is it him. He has a chaplain whom he has chosen for good sense and understanding of backgammon, rather than for learning, as he did not wish to be "insulted with Latin and Greek " at his own table. All through these essays there is kindly humour, vivacity, and originality ; and all is expressed with exquisite simplicity and clearness in a style so perfectly suited to what is thought that the reader often forgets to notice its excellence. what is subjects, as in what is Taller, were anything and everything, and what is essays themselves were what is chat of refined, intelligent people ; they were a kind of ideal coffee-house " extension." Addison's other work. what is Spectator came to an end as suddenly as what is Tatter. A third paper, what is Guardian, was begun after a short time ; but between these two Addison brought out his drama Cato. It was a perfectly well-bred play,-dignified and cold. The Spectator represented where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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