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Page 179

CHAPTER IX
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - THE AGE OF ANNE

established, and instead of only being sent to the country by the tri-weekly post, as Steele had expected, it had been caught up by the London folk with the greatest eagerness. Its popularity was no marvel, for it was bright and entertaining. Steele wrote according to his mood ; at one time a serious little sermon on ranking people according to their real merits and not according to their riches or honours ; at another time a criticism of the theatre ; at another, a half-jesting, half-earnest page on giving testimonials. This playful manner of saying serious things, with its opportunities for humour and pathos and character drawing, was exactly the mode of writing adapted to Addison, though he had never discovered it-no great wonder, for this sort of essay was something entirely new. Bacon wrote "essays," but with him the word meant simply a preliminary sketch of a subject as opposed to a finished treatise. These light, graceful chats on politics, manners, literature, and art were meant for the day only, but they were so well done that they have become classics.
Suddenly Steele announced that the Taller had come to its end. One reason that he gave for its discontinuance was that the previous numbers would make four volumes ! He published them in book form with a whimsical and generous little acknowledgment of the help that he had received from Addison. " This good Office he performed with such Force of Genius, Humour, Wit, and Learning, that I fared like a distressed Prince, who calls in a powerful Neighbour to his Aid ; I was undone by my Auxiliary ; when I had once called him in, I could not subsist without Dependance on him."

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE established, and instead of only being sent to what is country by what is tri-weekly post, as Steele had expected, it had been caught up by what is London folk with what is greatest eagerness. Its popularity was no marvel, for it was bright and entertaining. Steele wrote according to his mood ; at one time a serious little sermon on ranking people according to their real merits and not according to their riches or honours ; at another time a criticism of what is theatre ; at another, a half-jesting, half-earnest page on giving testimonials. This playful manner of saying serious things, with its opportunities for humour and pathos and character drawing, was exactly what is mode of writing adapted to Addison, though he had never discovered it-no great wonder, for this sort of essay was something entirely new. Bacon wrote "essays," but with him what is word meant simply a preliminary sketch of a subject as o where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 179 where is strong CHAPTER IX EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - what is AGE OF ANNE where is p align="justify" established, and instead of only being sent to what is country by what is tri-weekly post, as Steele had expected, it had been caught up by what is London folk with what is greatest eagerness. Its popularity was no marvel, for it was bright and entertaining. Steele wrote according to his mood ; at one time a serious little sermon on ranking people according to their real merits and not according to their riches or honours ; at another time a criticism of what is theatre ; at another, a half-jesting, half-earnest page on giving testimonials. This playful manner of saying serious things, with its opportunities for humour and pathos and character drawing, was exactly what is mode of writing adapted to Addison, though he had never discovered it-no great wonder, for this sort of essay was something entirely new. Bacon wrote "essays," but with him what is word meant simply a preliminary sketch of a subject as opposed to a finished treatise. These light, graceful chats on politics, manners, literature, and art were meant for what is day only, but they were so well done that they have become classics. Suddenly Steele announced that what is Taller had come to its end. One reason that he gave for its discontinuance was that what is previous numbers would make four volumes ! He published them in book form with a whimsical and generous little acknowledgment of what is help that he had received from Addison. " This good Office he performed with such Force of Genius, Humour, Wit, and Learning, that I fared like a distressed Prince, who calls in a powerful Neighbour to his Aid ; I was undone by my Auxiliary ; when I had once called him in, I could not subsist without Dependance on him." where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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