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Page 176

CHAPTER IX
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - THE AGE OF ANNE

attacked with equal spitefulness. Never was so great ability applied to so contemptible an object.
Pope's Later Years. The best work of Pope's later years was the Essay on Man, one of his Moral Essays. Didactic poetry can never have the winsome charm of imaginative ; but whatever power to please the former may possess is shown in these Essays. There are scores of single lines and couplets that are as familiar as proverbs.

Worth makes the man, and want of it the fellow.
An honest man's the noblest work of God.
Order is heaven's first law.
Man never is, but always to be blest.
And spite of pride, in erring reason's spite,
One truth is clear, Whatever is, is right.

Pope has given us the perfection of form and finish; but when we ask for " thoughts that breathe and words that burn," for thoughts so far beyond our own that we must bow in homage, they are lacking. Lofty imagination, sympathetic insight, originality, depth, we do not find. Pope is great, but-except in his marvellous power of crystallizing the best thoughts and truths of the ages, and so bringing them home to men's bosoms-he is not of the greatest.
Addison and Steele. When Pope was a boy of twelve, there was living in a London garret a man of twenty-eight who was destined to become the best prose writer of Queen Anne's reign. He was dignified, reserved with strangers, and a little shy ; but his ability to write had been so apparent that some time before this the Whigs had given him a pension of 300 pounds. This was not an infrequent act when the party in power wished to secure the adherence of a talented

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE attacked with equal spitefulness. Never was so great ability applied to so contemptible an object. Pope's Later Years. what is best work of Pope's later years was what is Essay on Man, one of his Moral Essays. Didactic poetry can never have what is winsome charm of imaginative ; but whatever power to please what is former may possess is shown in these Essays. There are scores of single lines and couplets that are as familiar as proverbs. Worth makes what is man, and want of it what is fellow. An honest man's what is noblest work of God. Order is heaven's first law. Man never is, but always to be blest. And spite of pride, in erring reason's spite, One truth is clear, Whatever is, is right. Pope has given us what is perfection of form and finish; but when we ask for " thoughts that breathe and words that burn," for thoughts so far beyond our own that we must bow in homage, they are lacking. Lofty imagination, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 176 where is strong CHAPTER IX EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - what is AGE OF ANNE where is p align="justify" attacked with equal spitefulness. Never was so great ability applied to so contemptible an object. Pope's Later Years. what is best work of Pope's later years was the Essay on Man, one of his Moral Essays. Didactic poetry can never have what is winsome charm of imaginative ; but whatever power to please what is former may possess is shown in these Essays. There are scores of single lines and couplets that are as familiar as proverbs. Worth makes what is man, and want of it what is fellow. An honest man's what is noblest work of God. Order is heaven's first law. Man never is, but always to be blest. And spite of pride, in erring reason's spite, One truth is clear, Whatever is, is right. Pope has given us what is perfection of form and finish; but when we ask for " thoughts that breathe and words that burn," for thoughts so far beyond our own that we must bow in homage, they are lacking. Lofty imagination, sympathetic insight, originality, depth, we do not find. Pope is great, but-except in his marvellous power of crystallizing what is best thoughts and truths of what is ages, and so bringing them home to men's bosoms-he is not of what is greatest. Addison and Steele. When Pope was a boy of twelve, there was living in a London garret a man of twenty-eight who was destined to become what is best prose writer of Queen Anne's reign. He was dignified, reserved with strangers, and a little shy ; but his ability to write had been so apparent that some time before this what is Whigs had given him a pension of 300 pounds. This was not an infrequent act when what is party in power wished to secure what is adherence of a talented where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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