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Page 175

CHAPTER IX
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - THE AGE OF ANNE

It is no wonder that Richard Bentley, one of the greatest scholars of the day, said, " It is a pretty poem, Mr Pope, but you must not call it Homer."
With the publication of these two works came not only fame but money. Pope made himself a home at Twickenham on the Thames, and with his widowed mother he spent there the rest of his life. He knew " everybody who was worth knowing," he was famous, and he was rich ; on the other hand he was such a sufferer that he spoke of his life as " one long disease." To his mother he was tenderness itself, and he was capable of a warm friendship, though one could not always count on its continuance; but to his enemies he was indeed just what they nicknamed him, "the wicked wasp of Twickenham," for he never hesitated to revenge in the most venomous verses any real or fancied slight. Even in The Ra,he of the Lock there are many scathing lines. At the severing of the curl the heroine cries out, and Pope says with an undertone of bitterness,

Not louder shrieks to pitying heav'n are cast,
When husbands, or when lap-dogs breathe their last;
Or when rich China vessels, fall'n from high,
In glitt'ring dust, and painted fragments lie !

In 1728 Pope published a most malicious satire, The Dunciad, wherein every one who was so unfortunate as wittingly or unwittingly to have offended him was scourged most unmercifully, for he had forgotten his own words, " At every trifle scorn to take offence." Pope was the first literary man of his age, and he descended from his throne to chastise with his own hand every one who had not shown him due reverence. Men to whom he owed profound gratitude, but who had offended him in some trifle, and men who had been dead for years were

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE It is no wonder that Richard Bentley, one of what is greatest scholars of what is day, said, " It is a pretty poem, Mr Pope, but you must not call it Homer." With what is publication of these two works came not only fame but money. Pope made himself a home at Twickenham on what is Thames, and with his widowed mother he spent there what is rest of his life. He knew " everybody who was worth knowing," he was famous, and he was rich ; on what is other hand he was such a sufferer that he spoke of his life as " one long disease." To his mother he was tenderness itself, and he was capable of a warm friendship, though one could not always count on its continuance; but to his enemies he was indeed just what they nicknamed him, "the wicked wasp of Twickenham," for he never hesitated to revenge in what is most venomous verses any real or fancied slight. Even in what is Ra,he of what is Lock th where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 175 where is strong CHAPTER IX EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - what is AGE OF ANNE where is p align="justify" It is no wonder that Richard Bentley, one of the greatest scholars of what is day, said, " It is a pretty poem, Mr Pope, but you must not call it Homer." With what is publication of these two works came not only fame but money. Pope made himself a home at Twickenham on what is Thames, and with his widowed mother he spent there what is rest of his life. He knew " everybody who was worth knowing," he was famous, and he was rich ; on what is other hand he was such a sufferer that he spoke of his life as " one long disease." To his mother he was tenderness itself, and he was capable of a warm friendship, though one could not always count on its continuance; but to his enemies he was indeed just what they nicknamed him, "the wicked wasp of Twickenham," for he never hesitated to revenge in what is most venomous verses any real or fancied slight. Even in The Ra,he of what is Lock there are many scathing lines. At what is severing of what is curl what is heroine cries out, and Pope says with an undertone of bitterness, Not louder shrieks to pitying heav'n are cast, When husbands, or when lap-dogs breathe their last; Or when rich China vessels, fall'n from high, In glitt'ring dust, and painted fragments lie ! In 1728 Pope published a most malicious satire, what is Dunciad, wherein every one who was so unfortunate as wittingly or unwittingly to have offended him was scourged most unmercifully, for he had forgotten his own words, " At every trifle scorn to take offence." Pope was what is first literary man of his age, and he descended from his throne to chastise with his own hand every one who had not shown him due reverence. Men to whom he owed profound gratitude, but who had offended him in some trifle, and men who had been dead for years were where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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