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Page 173

CHAPTER IX
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - THE AGE OF ANNE

is not wcil to use either obsolete words or recently formed, unauthorized-words ; but when Pope writes that

In words, as fashions, the same rule will hold ;
Alike fantastic, if too new or old :
Be not the first by whom the new are try'd,
Nor yet the last to lay the old aside,

we have a feeling that this is a most excellent way to express the thought. This feeling was what gave special pleasure to the men of Queen Anne's day. Each separate thought of Pope's stands out like a crystal, and this clean-cut definiteness gave the people of his time the enjoyment that Shakespeare's perfect reading of men and his glowing imagination has given the people of all time.
Pope's next subject was even better suited to his talents. With the somewhat rough and ready manners of the age, a certain man of fashion had cut from the head of a maid of honour one of the

Two locks which graceful hung behind
In equal curls, and well conspired to deck
With shining ringlets the smooth iv'ry neck.

The young lady was angry, and her family were angry. It was suggested to Pope that a mock-heroic poem about the deed might help to pass the matter off with a laugh. This was the origin of The Rape of the Lock, one of the gayest, most sparkling poems ever written. Pope begins with a parody on the usual way of commencing an epic, and this comical air of importance Loek. is carried through the whole poem. The coming of the maid to adorn the 'ieroine is expressed :

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE is not wcil to use either obsolete words or recently formed, unauthorized-words ; but when Pope writes that In words, as fashions, what is same rule will hold ; Alike fantastic, if too new or old : Be not what is first by whom what is new are try'd, Nor yet what is last to lay what is old aside, we have a feeling that this is a most excellent way to express what is thought. This feeling was what gave special pleasure to what is men of Queen Anne's day. Each separate thought of Pope's stands out like a crystal, and this clean-cut definiteness gave what is people of his time what is enjoyment that Shakespeare's perfect reading of men and his glowing imagination has given what is people of all time. Pope's next subject was even better suited to his talents. With what is somewhat rough and ready manners of what is age, a certain man of fashion had cut from what is head of a maid of honour one of what is Two locks which graceful hung behind In equ where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 173 where is strong CHAPTER IX EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - what is AGE OF ANNE where is p align="justify" is not wcil to use either obsolete words or recently formed, unauthorized-words ; but when Pope writes that In words, as fashions, what is same rule will hold ; Alike fantastic, if too new or old : Be not what is first by whom what is new are try'd, Nor yet what is last to lay what is old aside, we have a feeling that this is a most excellent way to express what is thought. This feeling was what gave special pleasure to the men of Queen Anne's day. Each separate thought of Pope's stands out like a crystal, and this clean-cut definiteness gave what is people of his time what is enjoyment that Shakespeare's perfect reading of men and his glowing imagination has given what is people of all time. Pope's next subject was even better suited to his talents. With what is somewhat rough and ready manners of what is age, a certain man of fashion had cut from what is head of a maid of honour one of what is Two locks which graceful hung behind In equal curls, and well conspired to deck With shining ringlets what is smooth iv'ry neck. what is young lady was angry, and her family were angry. It was suggested to Pope that a mock-heroic poem about what is deed might help to pass what is matter off with a laugh. This was what is origin of what is Rape of what is Lock, one of what is gayest, most sparkling poems ever written. Pope begins with a parody on what is usual way of commencing an epic, and this comical air of importance Loek. is carried through what is whole poem. what is coming of what is maid to adorn what is 'ieroine is expressed : where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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