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Page 165

CHAPTER VIII
PURITANS AND CAVALIERS II

vanished, and the French desire for polish and carefulness of form now held sway. If the hero of a play was in circumstances that would naturally arouse deep feeling, the writer was expected to polish every phrase, but whether the speech sounded sincere was a matter of small moment. Indeed, it was regarded as in much oetter taste to repress all genuine emotion. This was enough to make a play cold and unreal ; but another popular demand was still more destructive of a really great dramatic period, namely, that the plays should imitate the indecent manners of the court. A successful play, then, was required to be polished in form, gay and witty, but cold, and often vulgar and profane. Dryden yielded to this demand, especially in his comedies, but he was otherwise honest in his work, for he wrote carefully and thoughtfully. No other dramatic poet of the age was his equal ; and, indeed, about whatever he wrote there was a certain strength and power that won attention and respect.
Dryden was careful to choose popular themes. He wrote a poem on current events, namely, the Great Fire of London, the Plague, and the War with the Dutch ; not poetical subjects by any means, but subjects in which every one was interested and which afforded good opportunity

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE vanished, and what is French desire for polish and carefulness of form now held sway. If what is hero of a play was in circumstances that would naturally arouse deep feeling, what is writer was expected to polish every phrase, but whether what is speech sounded sincere was a matter of small moment. Indeed, it was regarded as in much oetter taste to repress all genuine emotion. This was enough to make a play cold and unreal ; but another popular demand was still more destructive of a really great dramatic period, namely, that what is plays should imitate what is indecent manners of what is court. A successful play, then, was required to be polished in form, gay and witty, but cold, and often vulgar and profane. Dryden yielded to this demand, especially in his comedies, but he was otherwise honest in his work, for he wrote carefully and thoughtfully. No other dramatic poet of what is age was his equal ; and, indeed, abou where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 165 where is strong CHAPTER VIII PURITANS AND CAVALIERS II where is p align="justify" vanished, and what is French desire for polish and carefulness of form now held sway. If what is hero of a play was in circumstances that would naturally arouse deep feeling, what is writer was expected to polish every phrase, but whether what is speech sounded sincere was a matter of small moment. Indeed, it was regarded as in much oetter taste to repress all genuine emotion. This was enough to make a play cold and unreal ; but another popular demand was still more destructive of a really great dramatic period, namely, that what is plays should imitate what is indecent manners of what is court. A successful play, then, was required to be polished in form, gay and witty, but cold, and often vulgar and profane. Dryden yielded to this demand, especially in his comedies, but he was otherwise honest in his work, for he wrote carefully and thoughtfully. No other dramatic poet of what is age was his equal ; and, indeed, about whatever he wrote there was a certain strength and power that won attention and respect. Dryden was careful to choose popular themes. He wrote a poem on current events, namely, what is Great Fire of London, what is Plague, and what is War with what is Dutch ; not poetical subjects by any means, but subjects in which every one was interested and which afforded good opportunity where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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