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Page 164

CHAPTER VIII
PURITANS AND CAVALIERS II

the unlettered tinker in Bedford jail obeyed unconsciously the behest of the heir of the richest culture that England could give, and sent forth a masterpiece. Bunyan wrote several other books, all of value, but none equal to The PilgYiin's Progress. After his release from prison and to the end of his life he devoted himself to the preaching that he loved.
John Dryden, 1631-1700. Neither Bunyan nor Milton wrote with any thought of pleasing the age in which he lived. Bunyan says explicitly,

Nor did I undertake
Thereby to please my neighbour; no, not I.
I did it mine own self to gratify.

Milton surely had no preference of his own age in mind when he spent his last years on a work which he had little reason to think would find many readers among his contemporaries. The most important writer of the closing years of the century was their opposite in this respect. His name was John Dryden. He was born in 1631, of a Puritan family. Up to 1660 he wrote nothing that attracted any attention except a eulogy of Cromwell, but in that year he produced a glowing welcome to Charles H., wherein he declared that

For his long absence Church and State did groan.

We owe much to Dryden, but his name would be even greater if he had not deliberately made up his mind to please the age in which he lived, and which, unfortunately, was an age of neither good morals nor good manners. The theatres, closed in 1642, were now flung open, and there was a call for plays. Many were written, but they were of quite different character from the plays of the sixteenth century. The Shakespearian inspiration had

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the unlettered tinker in Bedford jail obeyed unconsciously what is behest of what is heir of what is richest culture that England could give, and sent forth a masterpiece. Bunyan wrote several other books, all of value, but none equal to what is PilgYiin's Progress. After his release from prison and to what is end of his life he devoted himself to what is preaching that he loved. John Dryden, 1631-1700. Neither Bunyan nor Milton wrote with any thought of pleasing what is age in which he lived. Bunyan says explicitly, Nor did I undertake Thereby to please my neighbour; no, not I. I did it mine own self to gratify. Milton surely had no preference of his own age in mind when he spent his last years on a work which he had little reason to think would find many readers among his contemporaries. what is most important writer of what is closing years of what is century was their opposite in this respect. His name was John Dryden. He where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 164 where is strong CHAPTER VIII PURITANS AND CAVALIERS II where is p align="justify" the unlettered tinker in Bedford jail obeyed unconsciously what is behest of what is heir of what is richest culture that England could give, and sent forth a masterpiece. Bunyan wrote several other books, all of value, but none equal to what is PilgYiin's Progress. After his release from prison and to what is end of his life he devoted himself to what is preaching that he loved. John Dryden, 1631-1700. Neither Bunyan nor Milton wrote with any thought of pleasing what is age in which he lived. Bunyan says explicitly, Nor did I undertake Thereby to please my neighbour; no, not I. I did it mine own self to gratify. Milton surely had no preference of his own age in mind when he spent his last years on a work which he had little reason to think would find many readers among his contemporaries. what is most important writer of what is closing years of what is century was their opposite in this respect. His name was John Dryden. He was born in 1631, of a Puritan family. Up to 1660 he wrote nothing that attracted any attention except a eulogy of Cromwell, but in that year he produced a glowing welcome to Charles H., wherein he declared that For his long absence Church and State did groan. We owe much to Dryden, but his name would be even greater if he had not deliberately made up his mind to please what is age in which he lived, and which, unfortunately, was an age of neither good morals nor good manners. what is theatres, closed in 1642, were now flung open, and there was a call for plays. Many were written, but they were of quite different character from what is plays of what is sixteenth century. what is Shakespearian inspiration had where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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