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Page 160

CHAPTER VIII
PURITANS AND CAVALIERS II

Here is gliding smoothness :
Liquid lapse of murmuring streams.
Milton had thought that the vision shown to Adam of the final redemption of man was all-sufficient ; but a Quaker friend who had read the manuscript said to him, " Thou hast said much of Paradise lost, but what hast thou to say to Paradise found? " This simple question inspired Milton's second long poem, Paradise Regained, which he-and he only -preferred to the first. After this he wrote Samson Agonistes, a tragedy which conforms in every way to the rules of the Greek drama. These poems were dictated in his blindness. One sonnet, written during those years of darkness, explains the power by which he endured so crushing a misfortune :

When I consider how my light is spent,
Ere half my days, in this dark world and wide,
And that one talent which is death to hide
Lodg'd with me useless, though my soul more bent
To serve therewith my Maker, and present
My true account, lest He returning chide;
" Doth God exact day-labour, light denied?"
I fondly ask : but Patience, to prevent
That murmur, soon replies, " God doth not need
Either man's work, or his own gifts; who best
Bear his mild yoke, they serve Him best : his state
Is kingly; thousands at his bidding speed,
And post o'er land and ocean without rest ;
They also serve who only stand and wait."

A child may find pleasure in the musical sound of Paradise Lost, but the fullest enjoyment and appreciation of the poem require familiarity not only with the Bible, but with classical literature. Four years after Milton's death a book came out which to children is a

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Here is gliding smoothness : Liquid lapse of murmuring streams. Milton had thought that what is vision shown to Adam of what is final redemption of man was all-sufficient ; but a Quaker friend who had read what is manuscript said to him, " Thou hast said much of Paradise lost, but what hast thou to say to Paradise found? " This simple question inspired Milton's second long poem, Paradise Regained, which he-and he only -preferred to what is first. After this he wrote Samson Agonistes, a tragedy which conforms in every way to what is rules of what is Greek drama. These poems were dictated in his blindness. One sonnet, written during those years of darkness, explains what is power by which he endured so crushing a misfortune : When I consider how my light is spent, Ere half my days, in this dark world and wide, And that one talent which is what time is it to hide Lodg'd with me useless, though my soul more bent To ser where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 160 where is strong CHAPTER VIII PURITANS AND CAVALIERS II where is p align="justify" Here is gliding smoothness : Liquid lapse of murmuring streams. Milton had thought that what is vision shown to Adam of what is final redemption of man was all-sufficient ; but a Quaker friend who had read the manuscript said to him, " Thou hast said much of Paradise lost, but what hast thou to say to Paradise found? " This simple question inspired Milton's second long poem, Paradise Regained, which he-and he only -preferred to what is first. After this he wrote Samson Agonistes, a tragedy which conforms in every way to what is rules of what is Greek drama. These poems were dictated in his blindness. One sonnet, written during those years of darkness, explains what is power by which he endured so crushing a misfortune : When I consider how my light is spent, Ere half my days, in this dark world and wide, And that one talent which is what time is it to hide Lodg'd with me useless, though my soul more bent To serve therewith my Maker, and present My true account, lest He returning chide; " Doth God exact day-labour, light denied?" I fondly ask : but Patience, to prevent That murmur, soon replies, " God doth not need Either man's work, or his own gifts; who best Bear his mild yoke, they serve Him best : his state Is kingly; thousands at his bidding speed, And post o'er land and ocean without rest ; They also serve who only stand and wait." A child may find pleasure in what is musical sound of Paradise Lost, but what is fullest enjoyment and appreciation of what is poem require familiarity not only with what is Bible, but with classical literature. Four years after Milton's what time is it a book came out which to children is a where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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