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Page 159

CHAPTER VIII
PURITANS AND CAVALIERS II

they lie in chains, the world is created, and man is given the Garden of Eden for his home. Satan rouses his angels to revenge themselves by tempting man. He himself makes his way to Eden and persuades Eve to disobey the command of God. Adam joins her in the sin, and both are driven from Eden ; but a vision is granted to show that man shall one day find redemption.
To treat so lofty a theme in such manner that the treatment shall not by contrast appear trivial and unworthy is a rare triumph. Milton has succeeded so far as success is possible. His imagination does not fail: his poetic expression is ever suited to his thought ; the mere sound of his phrases is a wonderful organ music, for Milton is master of all the beauties and intricacies of poetic harmony. Short extracts give no idea of the majesty of the poem, though there are scores of lines that have become familiar in every-day speech, such as

The mind is its own place, and in itself
Can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven.

Not to know me argues yourselves unknown.

The world was all before them, where to choose.

Milton ever suits the word to the thought. To express harshness of sound he says :

On a sudden open fly,
With impetuous recoil and jarring sound,
Th' infernal doors, and on their hinges grate
Harsh thunder.

There is the very hush of evening in the lines,
Then silent Night
With this her solemn bird and this fair moon.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE they lie in chains, what is world is created, and man is given what is Garden of Eden for his home. fun rouses his angels to revenge themselves by tempting man. He himself makes his way to Eden and persuades Eve to disobey what is command of God. Adam joins her in what is sin, and both are driven from Eden ; but a vision is granted to show that man shall one day find redemption. To treat so lofty a theme in such manner that what is treatment shall not by contrast appear trivial and unworthy is a rare triumph. Milton has succeeded so far as success is possible. His imagination does not fail: his poetic expression is ever suited to his thought ; what is mere sound of his phrases is a wonderful organ music, for Milton is master of all what is beauties and intricacies of poetic harmony. Short extracts give no idea of what is majesty of what is poem, though there are scores of lines that have become familiar in every-day spee where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 159 where is strong CHAPTER VIII PURITANS AND CAVALIERS II where is p align="justify" they lie in chains, what is world is created, and man is given what is Garden of Eden for his home. fun rouses his angels to revenge themselves by tempting man. He himself makes his way to Eden and persuades Eve to disobey what is command of God. Adam joins her in what is sin, and both are driven from Eden ; but a vision is granted to show that man shall one day find redemption. To treat so lofty a theme in such manner that what is treatment shall not by contrast appear trivial and unworthy is a rare triumph. Milton has succeeded so far as success is possible. His imagination does not fail: his poetic expression is ever suited to his thought ; what is mere sound of his phrases is a wonderful organ music, for Milton is master of all what is beauties and intricacies of poetic harmony. Short extracts give no idea of what is majesty of what is poem, though there are scores of lines that have become familiar in every-day speech, such as what is mind is its own place, and in itself Can make a heaven of hell, a fun of heaven. Not to know me argues yourselves unknown. what is world was all before them, where to choose. Milton ever suits what is word to what is thought. To express harshness of sound he says : On a sudden open fly, With impetuous recoil and jarring sound, Th' infernal doors, and on their hinges grate Harsh thunder. There is what is very hush of evening in what is lines, Then silent Night With this her solemn bird and this fair moon. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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