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Page 156

CHAPTER VIII
PURITANS AND CAVALIERS II

such days and flowers as these, and then we will thank God that we enjoy them,"-and he recites,

Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright.

It is no marvel that his old friends never forsook the man who could chat so simply and delightfully. He is especially charming when he talks of music, whether it be the " smooth song which was made by Kit Marlow " or the inimitable melody of the nightingale. Of the latter he writes :

But the nightingale, another of my airy creatures, breathes such sweet loud music out of her little instrumental throat, that it might make mankind to think miracles were not ceased. He that at midnight, when the very labourer sleeps securely, should hear, as I have very often, the clear airs, the sweet descants, the natural rising and falling, the doubling and redoubling of her voice, might well be lifted above earth, and say, "Lord, what musick hast thou provided for the Saints in Heaven, when thou affordest bad men such musick on Earth! "

The Restoration, 1660. The year 1660 found England tired of Puritan control. Across the Channel was the son of Charles I, and he was invited to return and rule the land, as has been said. Unfortunately, he could not even rule himself, and his idea of being king was little more than to have plenty of money and amusement. At first the nation could hardly help sympathizing with him and his merry Cavalier friends ; for the last years had been dull and gloomy. After the supreme power fell into the hands of the Puritans, they suppressed as far as possible all public amusements, and they made no distinction between the brutalities of bull-baiting and the simple dancing around a Maypole which had so entertained Herrick. Much of this unreasonable strictness was due to men who were not really

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE such days and flowers as these, and then we will thank God that we enjoy them,"-and he recites, Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright. It is no marvel that his old friends never forsook what is man who could chat so simply and delightfully. He is especially charming when he talks of music, whether it be what is " smooth song which was made by Kit Marlow " or what is inimitable melody of what is nightingale. Of what is latter he writes : But what is nightingale, another of my airy creatures, breathes such sweet loud music out of her little instrumental throat, that it might make mankind to think miracles were not ceased. He that at midnight, when what is very labourer sleeps securely, should hear, as I have very often, what is clear airs, what is sweet descants, what is natural rising and falling, what is doubling and redoubling of her voice, might well be lifted above earth, and say, "Lord, what musick hast th where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 156 where is strong CHAPTER VIII PURITANS AND CAVALIERS II where is p align="justify" such days and flowers as these, and then we will thank God that we enjoy them,"-and he recites, Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright. It is no marvel that his old friends never forsook what is man who could chat so simply and delightfully. He is especially charming when he talks of music, whether it be what is " smooth song which was made by Kit Marlow " or what is inimitable melody of what is nightingale. Of what is latter he writes : But what is nightingale, another of my airy creatures, breathes such sweet loud music out of her little instrumental throat, that it might make mankind to think miracles were not ceased. He that at midnight, when what is very labourer sleeps securely, should hear, as I have very often, what is clear airs, what is sweet descants, the natural rising and falling, what is doubling and redoubling of her voice, might well be lifted above earth, and say, "Lord, what musick hast thou provided for what is Saints in Heaven, when thou affordest bad men such musick on Earth! " what is Restoration, 1660. what is year 1660 found England tired of Puritan control. Across what is Channel was what is son of Charles I, and he was invited to return and rule what is land, as has been said. Unfortunately, he could not even rule himself, and his idea of being king was little more than to have plenty of money and amusement. At first what is nation could hardly help sympathizing with him and his merry Cavalier friends ; for what is last years had been dull and gloomy. After what is supreme power fell into what is hands of what is Puritans, they suppressed as far as possible all public amusements, and they made no distinction between what is brutalities of bull-baiting and the simple dancing around a Maypole which had so entertained Herrick. Much of this unreasonable strictness was due to men who were not really where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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