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Page 149

CHAPTER VIII
PURITANS AND CAVALIERS II

will be perfect? " Apart from his earnestness Baxter's great charm lies in his simplicity and directness. Whoever reads the book feels as if the author were talking rather than writing, and talking directly to him and to no one else. He is sincere and powerful, but entirely without embellishments. He said he never had " leisure for polishing or exactness or any ornament." He thought of nothing but the good that he might do. When some one praised his books, he replied, " I was but a pen, and what praise is due to a pen ?"
The " Cavalier Poets." Entirely different from these earnest, serious preachers was a merry little group of " Cavalier Poets," as they have been called, all, save one, closely connected with the court of Charles I. In this group were four who were superior to the others of their class. They were Thomas Carew, Sir John Suckling, Richard Lovelace, and Robert Herrick.
Thomas Carew, 1598?-1645? Carew was sewer, or cup-bearer to King Charles, and was a favourite at the court. He would probably have won just as much praise from the gay company around him if he had written as carelessly as some of them, but that was not Carew's way. His poems are not deep and powerful, but they are never careless. He begins with a thought, perhaps a very simple one, but he is careful

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE will be perfect? " Apart from his earnestness Baxter's great charm lies in his simplicity and directness. Whoever reads what is book feels as if what is author were talking rather than writing, and talking directly to him and to no one else. He is sincere and powerful, but entirely without embellishments. He said he never had " leisure for polishing or exactness or any ornament." He thought of nothing but what is good that he might do. When some one praised his books, he replied, " I was but a pen, and what praise is due to a pen ?" what is " Cavalier Poets." Entirely different from these earnest, serious preachers was a merry little group of " Cavalier Poets," as they have been called, all, save one, closely connected with what is court of Charles I. In this group were four who were superior to what is others of their class. They were Thomas Carew, Sir John Suckling where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 149 where is strong CHAPTER VIII PURITANS AND CAVALIERS II where is p align="justify" will be perfect? " Apart from his earnestness Baxter's great charm lies in his simplicity and directness. Whoever reads what is book feels as if what is author were talking rather than writing, and talking directly to him and to no one else. He is sincere and powerful, but entirely without embellishments. He said he never had " leisure for polishing or exactness or any ornament." He thought of nothing but what is good that he might do. When some one praised his books, he replied, " I was but a pen, and what praise is due to a pen ?" what is " Cavalier Poets." Entirely different from these earnest, serious preachers was a merry little group of " Cavalier Poets," as they have been called, all, save one, closely connected with what is court of Charles I. In this group were four who were superior to what is others of their class. They were Thomas Carew, Sir John Suckling, Richard Lovelace, and Robert Herrick. Thomas Carew, 1598?-1645? Carew was sewer, or cup-bearer to King Charles, and was a favourite at what is court. He would probably have won just as much praise from what is gay company around him if he had written as carelessly as some of them, but that was not Carew's way. His poems are not deep and powerful, but they are never careless. He begins with a thought, perhaps a very simple one, but he is careful where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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