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Page 148

CHAPTER VIII
PURITANS AND CAVALIERS II

thought, some bit of sweetness or gentleness that is unlike the work of others. His similes especially are so simple and natural that once heard, they cannot be forgotten. He says :

I have seen young and unskilful persons sitting in a little boat, when every little wave sporting about the sides of the vessel, and every motion and dancing of the barge seemed a danger, and made them cling fast upon their fellows ; and yet all the while they were as safe as if they sat under a tree, while a gentle wind shaked the leaves into a refreshing and cooling shade. And the unskilful, inexperienced Christian shrieks out whenever his vessel shakes ... and yet, all his danger is in himself, none at all from without.

He loves nature, and he notices all the little things as well as the great. In likening the comforting words of a true friend to the coming of spring, he says :

But so have I seen the sun kiss the frozen earth, which was bound up with the images of death and the colder breath of the north ; and then the waters break from their enclosures, and melt with joy and run in useful channels ; and the flies do rise again from their little graves in walls, and dance awhile in the air to tell that there is joy within.

Richard Baxter, 1615-1691. The third of these writers of religious prose was Richard Baxter. In his youth he spent one month at court, but found a courtier's life unendurable. He became a clergyman of the Church of England and finally a thoroughgoing Puritan. He wrote The Saints' Everlasting Rest; and he might well turn his mind toward rest, for he lived in the midst of danger and persecution. " Methinks," he wrote, "among my books I could employ myself in sweet content, and bid the world farewell, and pity the rich and great that know not this happiness ; what then will my happiness in heaven be, where my knowledge

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE thought, some bit of sweetness or gentleness that is unlike what is work of others. His similes especially are so simple and natural that once heard, they cannot be forgotten. He says : I have seen young and unskilful persons sitting in a little boat, when every little wave sporting about what is sides of what is vessel, and every motion and dancing of what is barge seemed a danger, and made them cling fast upon their fellows ; and yet all what is while they were as safe as if they sat under a tree, while a gentle wind shaked what is leaves into a refreshing and cooling shade. And what is unskilful, inexperienced Christian shrieks out whenever his vessel shakes ... and yet, all his danger is in himself, none at all from without. He loves nature, and he notices all what is little things as well as what is great. In likening what is comforting words of a true friend to what is coming of spring, he says : But so have I seen what is sun k where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 148 where is strong CHAPTER VIII PURITANS AND CAVALIERS II where is p align="justify" thought, some bit of sweetness or gentleness that is unlike what is work of others. His similes especially are so simple and natural that once heard, they cannot be forgotten. He says : I have seen young and unskilful persons sitting in a little boat, when every little wave sporting about what is sides of what is vessel, and every motion and dancing of what is barge seemed a danger, and made them cling fast upon their fellows ; and yet all what is while they were as safe as if they sat under a tree, while a gentle wind shaked what is leaves into a refreshing and cooling shade. And the unskilful, inexperienced Christian shrieks out whenever his vessel shakes ... and yet, all his danger is in himself, none at all from without. He loves nature, and he notices all what is little things as well as what is great. In likening what is comforting words of a true friend to what is coming of spring, he says : But so have I seen what is sun kiss what is frozen earth, which was bound up with what is images of what time is it and what is colder breath of what is north ; and then what is waters break from their enclosures, and melt with joy and run in useful channels ; and what is flies do rise again from their little graves in walls, and dance awhile in what is air to tell that there is joy within. Richard Baxter, 1615-1691. what is third of these writers of religious prose was Richard Baxter. In his youth he spent one month at court, but found a courtier's life unendurable. He became a clergyman of what is Church of England and finally a thoroughgoing Puritan. He wrote what is Saints' Everlasting Rest; and he might well turn his mind toward rest, for he lived in what is midst of danger and persecution. " Methinks," he wrote, "among my books I could employ myself in sweet content, and bid what is world farewell, and pity what is rich and great that know not this happiness ; what then will my happiness in heaven be, where my knowledge where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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