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CHAPTER VIII
PURITANS AND CAVALIERS II

among the people, listening for hours at a time to the garrulous village gossips for the sake of obtaining some one good story, some bit of reminiscence, or an ancient doggerel rhyme, as the case might be ; and he put them all into his book, The Worthies of England, or Fuller's Worthies, as it is commonly called. He describes one man as a" facetious dissenting divine," another as a" pious divine;" of another he says, " He did first creep, then run, then fly into preferment ; or rather preferment did fly upon him without his expectation." He says of another man, " He was a partial writer," but adds consolingly that he is buried " near a good and true historian." He is full of quaint antitheses and conceits ; for example, he says that gardening is " a tapestry in earth," and that tapestry is a"gardening in cloth." Of the sister of Lady Jane Grey he writes that she wept so much that " though the roses in her cheeks looked very wan and pale, it was not for want of watering."
Jeremy Taylor, 1613-1667. The second of the religious writers, Jeremy Taylor, was the author of Holy Living and Holy Dying. I-Ie was one of the chaplains of King Charles, though there was some hesitation about appointing him because of his youth. The young man was equal to the occasion, however, for he begged the archbishop to pardon that fault and promised to mend it if he lived. He certainly deserved anything that England could offer if the account of his early sermons is at all accurate, which says his audience was forced to take him for " some young angel, newly descended from the visions of glory."
Jeremy Taylor is always fresh and bright and interesting. In whatever he says, there is some turn of

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