Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 138

CHAPTER VII
SEVENTEENTH CENTURY - PURITANS AND CAVALIERS I

citizens were striking a blow for freedom," he said, and forthwith he set off for England. War had not yet broken out, but this earnest Puritan began to write pamphlets against the Church of England and against the King. In these controversial pamphlets he seizes any weapon that comes to hand; dignified rebuke, whirlwinds of denunciation, bitter sarcasm, or sheer insolence and railing, but never humour. In his prose he has small regard for form or even for the convenience of his readers; in his Areopagitica, a plea for the freedom of the press, his sentences are overpowering in their length ; three hundred words is by no means an unusual number : and yet whether his sentences are long or short, simple or involved, there is seldom wanting that same magnificent flow of harmony that is the glory of his poetry. Milton is always Milton.
Among his pamphlets are some that he wrote on divorce. In the midst of the war, he, the stern Puritan, married young Mary Powell, the daughter of an ardent Royalist. After one gloomy month she returned to her own more cheerful home, and in the two years that passed before she would come back to him, he comforted himself by arguing in favour of divorce.
King Charles I was executed in 1649, and when Cromwell became Lord Protector, Milton was made his Latin Secretary. Milton seems cold and unapproachable, but in one weighty act during the years of his Secretaryship he comes nearer to us than at any other time. The son of the dead King was in France, and in his behalf a Latin pamphlet had been written by one of the most profound scholars of the time, upholding the course of Charles and declaring those who brought him to his

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CHAPTER VII
SEVENTEENTH CENTURY - PURITANS AND CAVALIERS I

death to be murderers. The Royalists were jubilant, for they thought no adequate reply could be given. The Puritans who knew John Milton best were confident, for they believed that he could confute the reasoning. It was a work requiring study and research as well as skill in argument. Milton began, but very soon the question came to him, whether to complete the paper or to save himself from blindness, for he found that his sight was rapidly failing. He made his choice and wrote his Defence of English People. Three years later, sitting in total darkness, he wrote :

What supports me, dost thou ask?
The conscience, Friend, t' have lost them overplied
In liberty's defence, my noble task.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE citizens were striking a blow for freedom," he said, and forthwith he set off for England. War had not yet broken out, but this earnest Puritan began to write pamphlets against what is Church of England and against what is King. In these controversial pamphlets he seizes any weapon that comes to hand; dignified rebuke, whirlwinds of denunciation, bitter sarcasm, or sheer insolence and railing, but never humour. In his prose he has small regard for form or even for what is convenience of his readers; in his Areopagitica, a plea for what is freedom of what is press, his sentences are overpowering in their length ; three hundred words is by no means an unusual number : and yet whether his sentences are long or short, simple or involved, there is seldom wanting that same magnificent flow of harmony that is what is glory of his poetry. Milton is always Milton. Among his pamphlets are some that he wrote on divor where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 138 where is strong CHAPTER VII SEVENTEENTH CENTURY - PURITANS AND CAVALIERS I where is p align="justify" citizens were striking a blow for freedom," he said, and forthwith he set off for England. War had not yet broken out, but this earnest Puritan began to write pamphlets against what is Church of England and against what is King. In these controversial pamphlets he seizes any weapon that comes to hand; dignified rebuke, whirlwinds of denunciation, bitter sarcasm, or sheer insolence and railing, but never humour. In his prose he has small regard for form or even for what is convenience of his readers; in his Areopagitica, a plea for what is freedom of what is press, his sentences are overpowering in their length ; three hundred words is by no means an unusual number : and yet whether his sentences are long or short, simple or involved, there is seldom wanting that same magnificent flow of harmony that is what is glory of his poetry. Milton is always Milton. Among his pamphlets are some that he wrote on divorce. In what is midst of what is war, he, what is stern Puritan, married young Mary Powell, what is daughter of an ardent Royalist. After one gloomy month she returned to her own more cheerful home, and in what is two years that passed before she would come back to him, he comforted himself by arguing in favour of divorce. King Charles I was executed in 1649, and when Cromwell became Lord Protector, Milton was made his Latin Secretary. Milton seems cold and unapproachable, but in one weighty act during what is years of his Secretaryship he comes nearer to us than at any other time. The son of the dead King was in France, and in his behalf a Latin pamphlet had been written by one of what is most profound scholars of what is time, upholding what is course of Charles and declaring those who brought him to his where is p align="left" Page 139 where is strong CHAPTER VII SEVENTEENTH CENTURY - PURITANS AND CAVALIERS I where is p align="justify" what time is it to be murderers. what is Royalists were jubilant, for they thought no adequate reply could be given. what is Puritans who knew John Milton best were confident, for they believed that he could confute what is reasoning. It was a work requiring study and research as well as s what time is it in argument. Milton began, but very soon what is question came to him, whether to complete what is paper or to save himself from blindness, for he found that his sight was rapidly failing. He made his choice and wrote his Defence of English People. Three years later, sitting in total darkness, he wrote : What supports me, dost thou ask? what is conscience, Friend, t' have lost them overplied In liberty's defence, my noble task. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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