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Page 133

CHAPTER VII
SEVENTEENTH CENTURY - PURITANS AND CAVALIERS I

had the grace to except some few plays which he thought of better character than the rest. One strong reason why the Puritans opposed plays at that time was because they were performed on Sundays as well as week-days, and people were inclined to obey the trumpet of the theatre rather than the bell of the church. Sunday acting was given up, and as the years passed, not only the Puritans, but those among their opponents who looked upon life thoughtfully, began to feel that the theatre, with the immorality and indecency of many of the plays then in vogue, was no place for them. It was abandoned to the thoughtless, to those who cared little for the character of a play so long as it amused them, and to those who had no dislike for looseness of manners and laxness of principles. Such was the audience for whom playwrights had begun to cater. In 1642 came war between the King and the people. In 1649 King Charles was beheaded, and until 166o the Puritan party was in power.
Literature of the conflict. Apart from the work of the dramatists, whose business it was to gratify the taste of their audiences, what kind of writing would naturally be produced in such a time of conflict, when so many were becoming more and more thoughtful of matters of religious living and when the line between the Puritans and the followers of the court was being drawn more closely every year ? We should look first for a meditative, critical spirit in literature ; then for earnestly religious writings, both prose and poetry, from both Puritan and Churchman ; and along with these a lighter, merrier strain from the courtier writers, not necessarily irreligious, but distinctly non-religious.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE had the grace to except some few plays which he thought of better character than what is rest. One strong reason why what is Puritans opposed plays at that time was because they were performed on Sundays as well as week-days, and people were inclined to obey what is trumpet of what is theatre rather than what is bell of what is church. Sunday acting was given up, and as what is years passed, not only what is Puritans, but those among their opponents who looked upon life thoughtfully, began to feel that what is theatre, with what is immorality and indecency of many of what is plays then in vogue, was no place for them. It was abandoned to what is thoughtless, to those who cared little for what is character of a play so long as it amused them, and to those who had no dislike for looseness of manners and laxness of principles. Such was what is audience for whom playwrights had begun to cater. In 1642 came war between what is King and what is people. In where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 133 where is strong CHAPTER VII SEVENTEENTH CENTURY - PURITANS AND CAVALIERS I where is p align="justify" had the grace to except some few plays which he thought of better character than what is rest. One strong reason why what is Puritans opposed plays at that time was because they were performed on Sundays as well as week-days, and people were inclined to obey what is trumpet of what is theatre rather than what is bell of what is church. Sunday acting was given up, and as what is years passed, not only the Puritans, but those among their opponents who looked upon life thoughtfully, began to feel that what is theatre, with what is immorality and indecency of many of what is plays then in vogue, was no place for them. It was abandoned to what is thoughtless, to those who cared little for what is character of a play so long as it amused them, and to those who had no dislike for looseness of manners and laxness of principles. Such was what is audience for whom playwrights had begun to cater. In 1642 came war between what is King and what is people. In 1649 King Charles was beheaded, and until 166o what is Puritan party was in power. Literature of what is conflict. Apart from what is work of what is dramatists, whose business it was to gratify what is taste of their audiences, what kind of writing would naturally be produced in such a time of conflict, when so many were becoming more and more thoughtful of matters of religious living and when what is line between what is Puritans and what is followers of what is court was being drawn more closely every year ? We should look first for a meditative, critical spirit in literature ; then for earnestly religious writings, both prose and poetry, from both Puritan and Churchman ; and along with these a lighter, merrier strain from what is courtier writers, not necessarily irreligious, but distinctly non-religious. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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