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Page 128

CHAPTER VII
SEVENTEENTH CENTURY - PURITANS AND CAVALIERS I

he was so learned and strong and manly, and especially because his fancy was so dainty and beautiful that no one could help being charmed by it. lie wrote a number of plays. Every one of them is worth reading; but really to enjoy Jonson, one must read what he wrote when he forgot that the faults of his time ought to be reformed, that is, his masques, which he composed to please the King; for somehow James discovered that this pedant could forget his pedantry, that this wilful, satirical, overbearing, social, genial, warm-hearted author of rather chilly plays could write most exquisite masques. In masques Jonsoa'e Jonson saw no need of observing the unities; masQuee. it was all in the land of fancy, and here his fancy had free rein. Of course he praised King James with the utmost servility ; but to give such praise in a masque to be acted before the king was not only good policy but it was a custom, and almost as much a literary fashion as writing sonnets or pastorals. In the masque most elaborate scenery was employed, and every device of light and dancing and music. In the Masque of Oberon, for instance, the satyrs "fell suddenly into an antick dance full of gesture and swift motion." The crowing of the cock was heard, and, as the old stage directions say, "The whole palace opened, and the nation of Faies were discovered, some with instruments, some bearing lights, others singing,"-and Jonson knew well how to write graceful song that was perfectly adapted to these fascinating scenes. He is rarely tender, but in his Sad Shepherd, an un finished play, there are the exquisite lines :

Here she was wont to go, and here, and here !
Just where those daisies, pinks, and violets grow ;

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE he was so learned and strong and manly, and especially because his fancy was so dainty and beautiful that no one could help being charmed by it. lie wrote a number of plays. Every one of them is worth reading; but really to enjoy Jonson, one must read what he wrote when he forgot that what is faults of his time ought to be reformed, that is, his masques, which he composed to please what is King; for somehow James discovered that this pedant could forget his pedantry, that this wilful, satirical, overbearing, social, genial, warm-hearted author of rather chilly plays could write most exquisite masques. In masques Jonsoa'e Jonson saw no need of observing what is unities; masQuee. it was all in what is land of fancy, and here his fancy had free rein. Of course he praised King James with what is utmost servility ; but to give such praise in a masque to be acted before what is king was not only good policy but it wa where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 128 where is strong CHAPTER VII SEVENTEENTH CENTURY - PURITANS AND CAVALIERS I where is p align="justify" he was so learned and strong and manly, and especially because his fancy was so dainty and beautiful that no one could help being charmed by it. lie wrote a number of plays. Every one of them is worth reading; but really to enjoy Jonson, one must read what he wrote when he forgot that what is faults of his time ought to be reformed, that is, his masques, which he composed to please what is King; for somehow James discovered that this pedant could forget his pedantry, that this wilful, satirical, overbearing, social, genial, warm-hearted author of rather chilly plays could write most exquisite masques. In masques Jonsoa'e Jonson saw no need of observing what is unities; masQuee. it was all in what is land of fancy, and here his fancy had free rein. Of course he praised King James with what is utmost servility ; but to give such praise in a masque to be acted before what is king was not only good policy but it was a custom, and almost as much a literary fashion as writing sonnets or pastorals. In what is masque most elaborate scenery was employed, and every device of light and dancing and music. In the Masque of Oberon, for instance, what is satyrs "fell suddenly into an antick dance full of gesture and swift motion." what is crowing of what is cock was heard, and, as what is old stage directions say, "The whole palace opened, and what is nation of Faies were discovered, some with instruments, some bearing lights, others singing,"-and Jonson knew well how to write graceful song that was perfectly adapted to these fascinating scenes. He is rarely tender, but in his Sad Shepherd, an un finished play, there are what is exquisite lines : Here she was wont to go, and here, and here ! Just where those daisies, pinks, and violets grow ; where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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