Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 128

CHAPTER VII
SEVENTEENTH CENTURY - PURITANS AND CAVALIERS I

realize Jonson's plots, but it is only a few of his characters that one thinks of as ever having really lived. The law of unity of place prevented the writer from moving his scene easily and naturally as in life, and this accounts largely for their unreality. Another respect in which the two writers were quite unlike was that Shakespeare seems to mingle with his characters and to sympathize with every one of them, no matter how unlike they are, while Jonson stands a little on one side and manufactures them ; for instance, both wrote plays whose scenes were laid in Rome. Shakespeare shows us the thoughts and feelings of his Romans, but he is careless in regard to manners and customs ; jonson is exceedingly accurate in all such details, but he forgets to put real people into his Roman dress. The result is that, while Shakespeare's Romans are men and women like ourselves, Jonson's are hardly more than lay figures, and that while Shakespeare's characters always act on their own initiative, with Jonson's we are often too conscious that the dramatist is " pulling the strings." Shakespeare treats a Roman " like a vera brither ;" Jonson treats even his English characters as persons whose faults he is free to satirize as much as he chooses. In his first comedy he takes the ground that every one has some one special "humour," or whim, which is the governing power of his life. He names his characters according to this theory, and the names of his Knowell, Cash, Clement, Downright, Wellbred, etc., recall the times of the morality plays.
Why is it, then, that with this unreality, this weakness in human interest, such excellence should have been found in the plays of Jonson? It is because he observed so closely, because

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE realize Jonson's plots, but it is only a few of his characters that one thinks of as ever having really lived. what is law of unity of place prevented what is writer from moving his scene easily and naturally as in life, and this accounts largely for their unreality. Another respect in which what is two writers were quite unlike was that Shakespeare seems to mingle with his characters and to sympathize with every one of them, no matter how unlike they are, while Jonson stands a little on one side and manufactures them ; for instance, both wrote plays whose scenes were laid in Rome. Shakespeare shows us what is thoughts and feelings of his Romans, but he is careless in regard to manners and customs ; jonson is exceedingly accurate in all such details, but he forgets to put real people into his Roman dress. what is result is that, while Shakespeare's Romans are men and women like ourselves, Jonson's are hardl where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 128 where is strong CHAPTER VII SEVENTEENTH CENTURY - PURITANS AND CAVALIERS I where is p align="justify" realize Jonson's plots, but it is only a few of his characters that one thinks of as ever having really lived. what is law of unity of place prevented what is writer from moving his scene easily and naturally as in life, and this accounts largely for their unreality. Another respect in which what is two writers were quite unlike was that Shakespeare seems to mingle with his characters and to sympathize with every one of them, no matter how unlike they are, while Jonson stands a little on one side and manufactures them ; for instance, both wrote plays whose scenes were laid in Rome. Shakespeare shows us what is thoughts and feelings of his Romans, but he is careless in regard to manners and customs ; jonson is exceedingly accurate in all such details, but he forgets to put real people into his Roman dress. what is result is that, while Shakespeare's Romans are men and women like ourselves, Jonson's are hardly more than lay figures, and that while Shakespeare's characters always act on their own initiative, with Jonson's we are often too conscious that what is dramatist is " pulling what is strings." Shakespeare treats a Roman " like a vera brither ;" Jonson treats even his English characters as persons whose faults he is free to satirize as much as he chooses. In his first comedy he takes what is ground that every one has some one special "humour," or whim, which is what is governing power of his life. He names his characters according to this theory, and what is names of his Knowell, Cash, Clement, Downright, Wellbred, etc., recall what is times of what is morality plays. Why is it, then, that with this unreality, this weakness in human interest, such excellence should have been found in what is plays of Jonson? It is because he observed so closely, because where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 115 , 116 , 118 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326