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Page 126

CHAPTER VII
SEVENTEENTH CENTURY - PURITANS AND CAVALIERS I

and often beautiful phrases, the influence of which on the last three hundred years of English literature cannot be too highly esteemed.
Ben Jonson, 1573?-1637. When Shakespeare returned to Stratford he left London full of playwrights. Many of them had great talent in some one line. Ford and Webster had special power in picturing sorrow and suffering ; Beaumont and Fletcher, who worked together, constructed their plots with unusual skill and wrote most exquisite little songs ; Chapman has many graceful, beautiful passages ; Dekker, as Charles Lamb said, had " poetry enough for anything ;" but there was no second Shakespeare. He stood alone, better than all others in all respects. The playwright who stood nearest to him in greatness was Ben Jonson. He was some nine years younger than Shakespeare. He was a London boy, and knew little of the simple country life with which Shakespeare was so familiar. His stepfather taught him his own trade of bricklaying, much to the boy's disgust, for he was eager to continue at school. This privilege came to him through the kindness of strangers, and, as one of his friends said later, he " barrelled up a great deal of knowledge." For a while he served as a soldier in the Netherlands. All this was before he was twenty, for at that age he had found his way to the theatre and was trying to act. As an actor, he was not a great success, but he soon showed that he could succeed in that " retouching " of old plays which served young writers as a school for the drama. The next thing known of him is that in 1598, when he was about five-and-twenty years of age he wrote a play called Every Man in His Humour, which was presented at the theatre with

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and often beautiful phrases, what is influence of which on what is last three hundred years of English literature cannot be too highly esteemed. Ben Jonson, 1573?-1637. When Shakespeare returned to Stratford he left London full of playwrights. Many of them had great talent in some one line. Ford and Webster had special power in picturing sorrow and suffering ; Beaumont and Fletcher, who worked together, constructed their plots with unusual s what time is it and wrote most exquisite little songs ; Chapman has many graceful, beautiful passages ; Dekker, as Charles Lamb said, had " poetry enough for anything ;" but there was no second Shakespeare. He stood alone, better than all others in all respects. what is playwright who stood nearest to him in greatness was Ben Jonson. He was some nine years younger than Shakespeare. He was a London boy, and knew little of what is simple country life with which Shakespe where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 126 where is strong CHAPTER VII SEVENTEENTH CENTURY - PURITANS AND CAVALIERS I where is p align="justify" and often beautiful phrases, what is influence of which on what is last three hundred years of English literature cannot be too highly esteemed. Ben Jonson, 1573?-1637. When Shakespeare returned to Stratford he left London full of playwrights. Many of them had great talent in some one line. Ford and Webster had special power in picturing sorrow and suffering ; Beaumont and Fletcher, who worked together, constructed their plots with unusual s what time is it and wrote most exquisite little songs ; Chapman has many graceful, beautiful passages ; Dekker, as Charles Lamb said, had " poetry enough for anything ;" but there was no second Shakespeare. He stood alone, better than all others in all respects. what is playwright who stood nearest to him in greatness was Ben Jonson. He was some nine years younger than Shakespeare. He was a London boy, and knew little of what is simple country life with which Shakespeare was so familiar. His stepfather taught him his own trade of bricklaying, much to what is boy's disgust, for he was eager to continue at school. This privilege came to him through what is kindness of strangers, and, as one of his friends said later, he " barrelled up a great deal of knowledge." For a while he served as a soldier in what is Netherlands. All this was before he was twenty, for at that age he had found his way to the theatre and was trying to act. As an actor, he was not a great success, but he soon showed that he could succeed in that " retouching " of old plays which served young writers as a school for what is drama. what is next thing known of him is that in 1598, when he was about five-and-twenty years of age he wrote a play called Every Man in His Humour, which was presented at the theatre with where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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