Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 124

CHAPTER VII
SEVENTEENTH CENTURY - PURITANS AND CAVALIERS I

read only in parts ; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly and with diligence and attention. ... Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man.

After James came to the throne, Bacon was raised from one position to another, until at last he becameLord High Chancellor. He lived with the utmost magnificence; he had fame, wealth, rank, and the favour of his sovereign. He had also enemies, and before three years had passed, a charge of accepting bribes was brought against him. He was declared guilty ; but his real guilt was far less than that of such a deed if done two centuries later; for the acceptance of bribes, or gifts, by men in high legal positions was a custom of long standing. No attempt was made to show that these gifts had made him decide even one cause unjustly.
Bacon's public life was ended, but it is quite possible that the few years which remained to him were his happiest, for, living quietly with his family, he had at
last the leisure for thought for which he had longed. Some time before this he had published more essays, and he had already begun the great work of his life, the InstauYatio A-fagna, that is, the " great institution " of true philosophy. This undertaking was the outgrowth of his boyish criticism of Oxford. He planned that the work should give a summary of human knowledge in all branches and should point out a system by which advancement might be made. The philosophers of the day were satisfied with words rather than things ; in seeking for knowledge of nature, for instance, it seemed to them the proper scholastic method not to study nature herself

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE read only in parts ; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly and with diligence and attention. ... Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man. After James came to what is throne, Bacon was raised from one position to another, until at last he becameLord High Chancellor. He lived with what is utmost magnificence; he had fame, wealth, rank, and what is favour of his sovereign. He had also enemies, and before three years had passed, a charge of accepting bribes was brought against him. He was declared guilty ; but his real guilt was far less than that of such a deed if done two centuries later; for what is acceptance of bribes, or gifts, by men in high legal positions was a custom of long standing. No attempt was made to show that these gifts had made him decide even one cause unjustly. Bacon's public life was ended, but it is quite possible tha where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 124 where is strong CHAPTER VII SEVENTEENTH CENTURY - PURITANS AND CAVALIERS I where is p align="justify" read only in parts ; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly and with diligence and attention. ... Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man. After James came to what is throne, Bacon was raised from one position to another, until at last he becameLord High Chancellor. He lived with the utmost magnificence; he had fame, wealth, rank, and what is favour of his sovereign. He had also enemies, and before three years had passed, a charge of accepting bribes was brought against him. He was declared guilty ; but his real guilt was far less than that of such a deed if done two centuries later; for what is acceptance of bribes, or gifts, by men in high legal positions was a custom of long standing. No attempt was made to show that these gifts had made him decide even one cause unjustly. Bacon's public life was ended, but it is quite possible that what is few years which remained to him were his happiest, for, living quietly with his family, he had at last what is leisure for thought for which he had longed. Some time before this he had published more essays, and he had already begun what is great work of his life, what is InstauYatio A-fagna, that is, what is " great institution " of true philosophy. This undertaking was what is outgrowth of his boyish criticism of Oxford. He planned that what is work should give a summary of human knowledge in all branches and should point out a system by which advancement might be made. what is philosophers of what is day were satisfied with words rather than things ; in seeking for knowledge of nature, for instance, it seemed to them what is proper scholastic method not to study nature herself where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 115 , 116 , 118 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326