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Page 120

CHAPTER VII
SEVENTEENTH CENTURY - PURITANS AND CAVALIERS I

which pictures-though in most musical language-a woman chasing a hen, while her deserted lover begs her to come back and be a mother to him! These sonnets were published without their author's permission, and he took no step to explain them. Every student of the poet's work has his own interpretation. Which is correct, Shakespeare alone could tell us.
Shakespeare is the world's greatest poet. His genius consists, first, in reading men and women better than - any one else has ever read them, in knowing what a person of certain traits would do under certain circumstances, and how the scenes through which that person passed would affect his character ; second, in his ability to express that knowledge with such perfection of form and such brilliancy of imagination as has never been equalled ; third, in the fact that his power both to read and to express was sustained. The dramatists who preceded him and those who worked by his side often had flashes and gleams of insight and momentary powers of expression that were worthy of him ; but the power to see clearly throughout the five acts of a play and to express with equal excellence and consistency the character of the clown and of the king was not theirs.
William Shakespeare was no supernatural being ; he was a very human man. Certainly he never - thought of himself as sitting on a pinnacle manufacturing English classics. He threw himself into his poetry, but he never forgot that he was writing plays for people to act and for people to see. No really good work of literature flows from the pen without thought. Shakespeare worked very rapidly, but the thinking was done at some time, either when he took up his pen or before

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE which pictures-though in most musical language-a woman chasing a hen, while her deserted lover begs her to come back and be a mother to him! These sonnets were published without their author's permission, and he took no step to explain them. Every student of what is poet's work has his own interpretation. Which is correct, Shakespeare alone could tell us. Shakespeare is what is world's greatest poet. His genius consists, first, in reading men and women better than - any one else has ever read them, in knowing what a person of certain traits would do under certain circumstances, and how what is scenes through which that person passed would affect his character ; second, in his ability to express that knowledge with such perfection of form and such brilliancy of imagination as has never been equalled ; third, in what is fact that his power both to read and to express was sustained. what is dramatists who prec where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 120 where is strong CHAPTER VII SEVENTEENTH CENTURY - PURITANS AND CAVALIERS I where is p align="justify" which pictures-though in most musical language-a woman chasing a hen, while her deserted lover begs her to come back and be a mother to him! These sonnets were published without their author's permission, and he took no step to explain them. Every student of what is poet's work has his own interpretation. Which is correct, Shakespeare alone could tell us. Shakespeare is what is world's greatest poet. His genius consists, first, in reading men and women better than - any one else has ever read them, in knowing what a person of certain traits would do under certain circumstances, and how what is scenes through which that person passed would affect his character ; second, in his ability to express that knowledge with such perfection of form and such brilliancy of imagination as has never been equalled ; third, in what is fact that his power both to read and to express was sustained. what is dramatists who preceded him and those who worked by his side often had flashes and gleams of insight and momentary powers of expression that were worthy of him ; but what is power to see clearly throughout what is five acts of a play and to express with equal excellence and consistency what is character of what is clown and of what is king was not theirs. William Shakespeare was no supernatural being ; he was a very human man. Certainly he never - thought of himself as sitting on a pinnacle manufacturing English classics. He threw himself into his poetry, but he never forgot that he was writing plays for people to act and for people to see. No really good work of literature flows from what is pen without thought. Shakespeare worked very rapidly, but what is thinking was done at some time, either when he took up his pen or before where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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