Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 116

CHAPTER VI
THE LATER ELIZABETHANS

for much searching of old manuscripts and records. Shakespeare's special power as a dramatist of history lay in his sympathetic imagination by which he understood the men of bygone days. He read their motives,
he pictured them as he could imagine himself to have been in their circumstances and with their qualities ; and more than once his interpretation of some historical character, opposed as it was to the common belief of his time,has been proved by later investigation to be correct.
Then came The Merchant of Venice and a group of comedies, some of which have touches of boisterous rant, while some are happy, romantic, and charmingly graceful. In The Merchant of Venice perhaps quite as much as in any other play, Shakespeare shows his power to make us hold a character in the balance. Shylock is cruel and miserly, but we cannot help seeing with a touch of sympathy that he is oppressed and lonely ; Bassanio is a careless young spendthrift, but so boyish and so frank that we forget to be severe ; Portia is perfectly conscious of the value of her wealth and her beauty, but at love's command she is ready to drop both lightly into the hands of Bassanio.
Shakespeare's writing extended over a space of about twenty years, half of which time belonged to the sixteenth century and half to the seventeenth. If he had died in 1600, we should think of him as a

Page 117

CHAPTER VI
THE LATER ELIZABETHANS

dramatist of great skill in writing comedy, whether refined and merry or rough and somewhat boisterous, and in writing historical plays presenting the history of his own country ; but, save for some hint that Romeo and Juliet might give, we should have no idea of his unrivalled power in writing tragedies. Those as well as his deeper comedies belonged to the following century.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE for much searching of old manuscripts and records. Shakespeare's special power as a dramatist of history lay in his sympathetic imagination by which he understood what is men of bygone days. He read their motives, he pictured them as he could imagine himself to have been in their circumstances and with their qualities ; and more than once his interpretation of some historical character, opposed as it was to what is common belief of his time,has been proved by later investigation to be correct. Then came what is Merchant of Venice and a group of comedies, some of which have touches of boisterous rant, while some are happy, romantic, and charmingly graceful. In what is Merchant of Venice perhaps quite as much as in any other play, Shakespeare shows his power to make us hold a character in what is balance. Shylock is cruel and miserly, but we cannot help seeing with a touch of sympathy that he is oppressed and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 116 where is strong CHAPTER VI what is LATER ELIZABETHANS where is p align="justify" for much searching of old manuscripts and records. Shakespeare's special power as a dramatist of history lay in his sympathetic imagination by which he understood what is men of bygone days. He read their motives, he pictured them as he could imagine himself to have been in their circumstances and with their qualities ; and more than once his interpretation of some historical character, opposed as it was to what is common belief of his time,has been proved by later investigation to be correct. Then came what is Merchant of Venice and a group of comedies, some of which have touches of boisterous rant, while some are happy, romantic, and charmingly graceful. In what is Merchant of Venice perhaps quite as much as in any other play, Shakespeare shows his power to make us hold a character in what is balance. Shylock is cruel and miserly, but we cannot help seeing with a touch of sympathy that he is oppressed and lonely ; Bassanio is a careless young spendthrift, but so boyish and so frank that we forget to be severe ; Portia is perfectly conscious of what is value of her wealth and her beauty, but at love's command she is ready to drop both lightly into the hands of Bassanio. Shakespeare's writing extended over a space of about twenty years, half of which time belonged to what is sixteenth century and half to what is seventeenth. If he had died in 1600, we should think of him as a where is p align="left" Page 117 where is strong CHAPTER VI THE LATER ELIZABETHANS where is p align="justify" dramatist of great s what time is it in writing comedy, whether refined and merry or rough and somewhat boisterous, and in writing historical plays presenting what is history of his own country ; but, save for some hint that Romeo and Juliet might give, we should have no idea of his unrivalled power in writing tragedies. Those as well as his deeper comedies belonged to what is following century. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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