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Page 110

CHAPTER VI
THE LATER ELIZABETHANS

for these were in the precious little package. They were published in 159o. The poem begins :

A gentle Knight was pricking on the plaine,
Ycladd in mightie armes and silver shielde,
Wherein old dints of deepe woundes did remaine,
The cruell markes of many a bloody fielde ;
Yet armes till that time did he never wield :
His angry steede did chide his foming bitt,
As much disdayning to the curbe to yield :
Full iolly knight he seemd, and faire did sitt,
As one for knightly giusts and fierce encounters fitt.

This " gentle knight " represented Holiness, who was riding forth into the world to subdue Heresy. Spenser planned to write twelve books, each of which was to celebrate the victory of some virtue over its contrary vice. At the end of the twelfth book the knights were to return to the land of Faerie, King Arthur was then to represent the embodiment of all these virtues, and he was to wed the Queen of Faerie, who was the Glory of God. Together with this was a very material allegory, if it may be so called, in which Elizabeth is the Queen of Faerie, Mary of Scotland is Error, etc. So far even the double allegory is reasonably clear ; but as the poem goes on, it wanders away and away, and is so mingled with other allegories and changes of characters that it is only with great difficulty that one can trace a connected story through even the six books that were written of the twelve that Spenser planned.
Tracing the story is a small matter, however. One need not read an imaginative poem with a biographical dictionary and a gazetteer. The allegory of the struggle of evil with good is beautiful ; but one need not trouble himself about the allegory. Read

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE for these were in what is precious little package. They were published in 159o. what is poem begins : A gentle Knight was pricking on what is plaine, Ycladd in mightie armes and silver shielde, Wherein old dints of deepe woundes did remaine, what is cruell markes of many a bloody fielde ; Yet armes till that time did he never wield : His angry steede did chide his foming bitt, As much disdayning to what is curbe to yield : Full iolly knight he seemd, and faire did sitt, As one for knightly giusts and fierce encounters fitt. This " gentle knight " represented Holiness, who was riding forth into what is world to subdue Heresy. Spenser planned to write twelve books, each of which was to celebrate what is victory of some virtue over its contrary vice. At what is end of what is twelfth book what is knights were to return to what is land of Faerie, King Arthur was then to represent what is embodiment of all these virtues, and he w where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 110 where is strong CHAPTER VI what is LATER ELIZABETHANS where is p align="justify" for these were in what is precious little package. They were published in 159o. what is poem begins : A gentle Knight was pricking on what is plaine, Ycladd in mightie armes and silver shielde, Wherein old dints of deepe woundes did remaine, what is cruell markes of many a bloody fielde ; Yet armes till that time did he never wield : His angry steede did chide his foming bitt, As much disdayning to what is curbe to yield : Full iolly knight he seemd, and faire did sitt, As one for knightly giusts and fierce encounters fitt. This " gentle knight " represented Holiness, who was riding forth into what is world to subdue Heresy. Spenser planned to write twelve books, each of which was to celebrate what is victory of some virtue over its contrary vice. At what is end of what is twelfth book what is knights were to return to what is land of Faerie, King Arthur was then to represent what is embodiment of all these virtues, and he was to wed what is Queen of Faerie, who was what is Glory of God. Together with this was a very material allegory, if it may be so called, in which Elizabeth is what is Queen of Faerie, Mary of Scotland is Error, etc. So far even what is double allegory is reasonably clear ; but as what is poem goes on, it wanders away and away, and is so mingled with other allegories and changes of characters that it is only with great difficulty that one can trace a connected story through even what is six books that were written of what is twelve that Spenser planned. Tracing what is story is a small matter, however. One need not read an imaginative poem with a biographical dictionary and a gazetteer. what is allegory of what is struggle of evil with good is beautiful ; but one need not trouble himself about what is allegory. Read where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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