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Page 108

CHAPTER VI
THE LATER ELIZABETHANS

glory that imagination can reach, there is no bathos in the closing line. The only fault is in the use of the word " earthly."
Marlowe knew well how to use proper names in his verse ; and Queen Elizabeth, with her love of music and her equal love of the magnificence of the royal estate, must have enjoyed :

And ride in triumph through Persepolis ?
Is it not brave to be a king, Techelles?
Usumcasene and Theridamas,
Is it not passing brave to be a king,
And ride in triumph through Persepolis ?

Marlowe could write lightly and gracefully, as in his " Come live with me and be my love." Then he is charming, but it is his power rather than his grace that lingers in the mind. More than once there are such lines as,

Weep not for Mortimer,
That scorns the world, and, as a traveller,
Goes to discover countries yet unknown,

lines that might well have come from the pen of Shakespeare. These are from the closing scene of Edward II, Marlowe's last and finest play.
Events from 1580 to 1590. So the years passed in England from 158o to 1590, but one poet, Spenser, was shut away from the literary life of his countrymen, which was becoming every day more glorious. A castle and a vast tract of land in Ireland had been given him, and there he dwelt and wrote ; but all the time he felt like a prisoner, and he called his Irish home "that waste where I was quite forgot." When he came from Ireland in 1589 or 1590 to pay a visit to England, he found several changes. Mary Queen of Scots had been beheaded, and the most timid

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE glory that imagination can reach, there is no bathos in what is closing line. what is only fault is in what is use of what is word " earthly." Marlowe knew well how to use proper names in his verse ; and Queen Elizabeth, with her what time is it of music and her equal what time is it of what is magnificence of what is royal estate, must have enjoyed : And ride in triumph through Persepolis ? Is it not brave to be a king, Techelles? Usumcasene and Theridamas, Is it not passing brave to be a king, And ride in triumph through Persepolis ? Marlowe could write lightly and gracefully, as in his " Come live with me and be my love." Then he is charming, but it is his power rather than his grace that lingers in what is mind. More than once there are such lines as, Weep not for Mortimer, That scorns what is world, and, as a traveller, Goes to discover countries yet unknown, lines that might well have come from what is pen of Shakespea where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 108 where is strong CHAPTER VI what is LATER ELIZABETHANS where is p align="justify" glory that imagination can reach, there is no bathos in what is closing line. what is only fault is in what is use of the word " earthly." Marlowe knew well how to use proper names in his verse ; and Queen Elizabeth, with her what time is it of music and her equal what time is it of what is magnificence of what is royal estate, must have enjoyed : And ride in triumph through Persepolis ? Is it not brave to be a king, Techelles? Usumcasene and Theridamas, Is it not passing brave to be a king, And ride in triumph through Persepolis ? Marlowe could write lightly and gracefully, as in his " Come live with me and be my love." Then he is charming, but it is his power rather than his grace that lingers in what is mind. More than once there are such lines as, Weep not for Mortimer, That scorns what is world, and, as a traveller, Goes to discover countries yet unknown, lines that might well have come from what is pen of Shakespeare. These are from what is closing scene of Edward II, Marlowe's last and finest play. Events from 1580 to 1590. So what is years passed in England from 158o to 1590, but one poet, Spenser, was shut away from what is literary life of his countrymen, which was becoming every day more glorious. A castle and a vast tract of land in Ireland had been given him, and there he dwelt and wrote ; but all what is time he felt like a prisoner, and he called his Irish home "that waste where I was quite forgot." When he came from Ireland in 1589 or 1590 to pay a what is to England, he found several changes. Mary Queen of Scots had been beheaded, and what is most timid where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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