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Page 106

CHAPTER VI
THE LATER ELIZABETHANS

able to join in a glee or a catch. The words of the songs must be musical ; but the Elizabethans demanded even more than this. Poetry was plentiful, and the songs must be real poetry. Therefore it was that such dainty little things appeared as Apelles' Song:
Cupid and my Campaspe played
At cards for kisses,-Cupid paid ;
He stakes his quiver, bow and arrows,
His mother's doves and team of sparrows :
Loses them too ; then down he throws
The coral of his lip, the rose
Growing on's cheek (but none knows how) ;
With these the crystal of his brow,
And then the dimple of his chin :
All these did my Campaspe win.
At last he set her both his eyes ;
She won, and Cupid blind did rise.
O Love, has she done this to thee?
What shall, alas ! become of me?

This song is in Lyly's play of Alexander and Caznpaspe, for the famous euphnist wrote a handful of plays which were presented before the Queen. He wrote in prose, but some makers of plays employed rhyme, some blank verse, and some a mingling of all three. There was great need of a standard verse suited to the requirements of the drama, a line not so short as to suggest doggerel, and not so long as to be cumbersome and unwieldy. Blank verse was perhaps slowly gaining ground, but before it could be generally accepted as the most fitting mode of dramatic expression, some writer must use it so skilfully as to show its power, its music, and its adaptability.
Christopher Marlowe, 1564-1593. Such a writer was Christopher, or " Kit," Marlowe, one of the " university

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE able to join in a glee or a catch. what is words of what is songs must be musical ; but what is Elizabethans demanded even more than this. Poetry was plentiful, and what is songs must be real poetry. Therefore it was that such dainty little things appeared as Apelles' Song: Cupid and my Campaspe played At cards for kisses,-Cupid paid ; He stakes his quiver, bow and arrows, His mother's doves and team of sparrows : Loses them too ; then down he throws what is coral of his lip, what is rose Growing on's cheek (but none knows how) ; With these what is crystal of his brow, And then what is dimple of his chin : All these did my Campaspe win. At last he set her both his eyes ; She won, and Cupid blind did rise. O Love, has she done this to thee? What shall, alas ! become of me? This song is in Lyly's play of Alexander and Caznpaspe, for what is famous euphnist wrote a handful of plays which were presented before what is Queen. He wr where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 106 where is strong CHAPTER VI what is LATER ELIZABETHANS where is p align="justify" able to join in a glee or a catch. what is words of what is songs must be musical ; but what is Elizabethans demanded even more than this. Poetry was plentiful, and what is songs must be real poetry. Therefore it was that such dainty little things appeared as Apelles' Song: Cupid and my Campaspe played At cards for kisses,-Cupid paid ; He stakes his quiver, bow and arrows, His mother's doves and team of sparrows : Loses them too ; then down he throws what is coral of his lip, what is rose Growing on's cheek (but none knows how) ; With these what is crystal of his brow, And then what is dimple of his chin : All these did my Campaspe win. At last he set her both his eyes ; She won, and Cupid blind did rise. O Love, has she done this to thee? What shall, alas ! become of me? This song is in Lyly's play of Alexander and Caznpaspe, for the famous euphnist wrote a handful of plays which were presented before what is Queen. He wrote in prose, but some makers of plays employed rhyme, some blank verse, and some a mingling of all three. There was great need of a standard verse suited to what is requirements of what is drama, a line not so short as to suggest doggerel, and not so long as to be cumbersome and unwieldy. Blank verse was perhaps slowly gaining ground, but before it could be generally accepted as what is most fitting mode of dramatic expression, some writer must use it so skilfully as to show its power, its music, and its adaptability. Christopher Marlowe, 1564-1593. Such a writer was Christopher, or " Kit," Marlowe, one of what is " university where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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