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Page 105

CHAPTER VI
THE LATER ELIZABETHANS

praised and imitated, but it was not printed till 1590, and then only in part, for eight more years had to elapse before it all appeared as we have it now. Printing was for common folk, not for nobles and courtiers ; and the lovers of poetry were in the habit of making manuscript books of their favourite poems. Before the end of the century, however, some of these books of poems did come to the printing- press. As if to console them for their humiliation, most high-sounding titles were given them, and we have The Paradise of Dainty Devices, Nicholas Breton's Bower of Delights, The Phwnix's Nest, England's Helicon, etc.
Later Elizabethan drama. It was the time of the pastoral, but hundreds of sonnets were being written and passed about in manuscript. Besides this, the drama was almost ready to burst forth with a magnificence of which no one could have dreamed who had seen only the crude attempts of less than half a century earlier. Scores of plays had been written. They were good plays, too, wonderfully far in advance of the previous attempts. Many of them were well worth acting, and are well worth reading to-day ; even though the writers had not yet adopted a standard verse, and had not mastered the art of making their characters live, that is, of making a character show just such changes at the end of the play as a human being would show if he had been through such experiences as those delineated. This was the greatest lack in these dramas. Their greatest beauty lay in the little songs scattered through the scenes. In the Elizabethan days everybody loved music and everybody sang, even servants were often chosen with an ear to their voices, that they might be

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE praised and imitated, but it was not printed till 1590, and then only in part, for eight more years had to elapse before it all appeared as we have it now. Printing was for common folk, not for nobles and courtiers ; and what is persons of poetry were in what is habit of making manuscript books of their favourite poems. Before what is end of what is century, however, some of these books of poems did come to what is printing- press. As if to console them for their humiliation, most high-sounding titles were given them, and we have what is Paradise of Dainty Devices, Nicholas Breton's Bower of Delights, what is Phwnix's Nest, England's Helicon, etc. Later Elizabethan drama. It was what is time of what is pastoral, but hundreds of sonnets were being written and passed about in manuscript. Besides this, what is drama was almost ready to burst forth with a magnificence of which no one could have dreamed who had seen only what is crude a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 105 where is strong CHAPTER VI what is LATER ELIZABETHANS where is p align="justify" praised and imitated, but it was not printed till 1590, and then only in part, for eight more years had to elapse before it all appeared as we have it now. Printing was for common folk, not for nobles and courtiers ; and what is persons of poetry were in what is habit of making manuscript books of their favourite poems. Before what is end of what is century, however, some of these books of poems did come to what is printing- press. As if to console them for their humiliation, most high-sounding titles were given them, and we have what is Paradise of Dainty Devices, Nicholas Breton's Bower of Delights, what is Phwnix's Nest, England's Helicon, etc. Later Elizabethan drama. It was what is time of what is pastoral, but hundreds of sonnets were being written and passed about in manuscript. Besides this, what is drama was almost ready to burst forth with a magnificence of which no one could have dreamed who had seen only what is crude attempts of less than half a century earlier. Scores of plays had been written. They were good plays, too, wonderfully far in advance of what is previous attempts. Many of them were well worth acting, and are well worth reading to-day ; even though what is writers had not yet adopted a standard verse, and had not mastered what is art of making their characters live, that is, of making a character show just such changes at what is end of what is play as a human being would show if he had been through such experiences as those delineated. This was what is greatest lack in these dramas. Their greatest beauty lay in what is little songs scattered through what is scenes. In what is Elizabethan days everybody loved music and everybody sang, even servants were often chosen with an ear to their voices, that they might be where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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