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Page 100

CHAPTER VI
THE LATER ELIZABETHANS

If Trauailers in this our age were ... as willing to reape profit by their paines, as they are to endure perill for their pleasure, they would either prefer their own soyle before a straunge Land or good counsell before their owne conceyte.

Another sentence declares :
As the Egle at euery flight looseth a fether, which maketh hir bald in hir age : so the trauailer in euery country looseth some fleece, which maketh him a begger in his youth.

This affected manner of talking and writing fell in with the whim of the age, and was soon the height of navan- the fashion. Foolish and unnatural as it tages of seems, it brought to English prose precisely euphuism. what that prose needed, that is, a plan for each sentence. Far too many writers, not only in King Alfred's time but long afterward, had plunged into their sentences with the utmost audacity, trusting to luck to bring them out; but whoever wrote in euphuistic fashion was obliged to plan his sentences and choose his words.
Euphuism was only the chief of the little affectations of style that influenced the literature of Elizabethan times. Throughout the rest of the century, and far into the next, one poetic disguise after another was welcomed.
Edmund Spenser, 1552?-1599. One of the most popular of these disguises was the pastoral, wherein the characters are spoken of as shepherds and shepherdesses. They have the sheep and the crook, but in their thought they are anything but simple shepherds. The first of these pastorals Tne shep- was written by Edmund Spenser, and is called The Shepherds Calendar. Spenser was a London boy, who began to write poetry in his school-days, but almost nothing is known of him

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE If Trauailers in this our age were ... as willing to reape profit by their paines, as they are to endure perill for their pleasure, they would either prefer their own soyle before a straunge Land or good counsell before their owne conceyte. Another sentence declares : As what is Egle at euery flight looseth a fether, which maketh hir bald in hir age : so what is trauailer in euery country looseth some fleece, which maketh him a begger in his youth. This affected manner of talking and writing fell in with what is whim of what is age, and was soon what is height of navan- what is fashion. Foolish and unnatural as it tages of seems, it brought to English prose precisely euphuism. what that prose needed, that is, a plan for each sentence. Far too many writers, not only in King Alfred's time but long afterward, had plunged into their sentences with what is utmost audacity, trusting to luck to bring them out; but whoever where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 100 where is strong CHAPTER VI what is LATER ELIZABETHANS where is p align="justify" If Trauailers in this our age were ... as willing to reape profit by their paines, as they are to endure perill for their pleasure, they would either prefer their own soyle before a straunge Land or good counsell before their owne conceyte. Another sentence declares : As what is Egle at euery flight looseth a fether, which maketh hir bald in hir age : so what is trauailer in euery country looseth some fleece, which maketh him a begger in his youth. This affected manner of talking and writing fell in with what is whim of what is age, and was soon what is height of navan- what is fashion. Foolish and unnatural as it tages of seems, it brought to English prose precisely euphuism. what that prose needed, that is, a plan for each sentence. Far too many writers, not only in King Alfred's time but long afterward, had plunged into their sentences with what is utmost audacity, trusting to luck to bring them out; but whoever wrote in euphuistic fashion was obliged to plan his sentences and choose his words. Euphuism was only what is chief of what is little affectations of style that influenced what is literature of Elizabethan times. Throughout what is rest of what is century, and far into what is next, one poetic disguise after another was welcomed. Edmund Spenser, 1552?-1599. One of what is most popular of these disguises was what is pastoral, wherein what is characters are spoken of as shepherds and shepherdesses. They have what is sheep and what is crook, but in their thought they are anything but simple shepherds. what is first of these pastorals Tne shep- was written by Edmund Spenser, and is called The Shepherds Calendar. Spenser was a London boy, who began to write poetry in his school-days, but almost nothing is known of him where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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