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Page 97

CHAPTER V
SIXTEENTH CENTURY - RENAISSANCE AND EARLY ELIZABETHANS

that the country was theirs. The Queen loved her land and her subjects, and the people of England were quick to feel the new sense of harmony between the ruler and the ruled. England became rapidly stronger. Her sea-captains sailed fearlessly into the Arctic and Pacific Oceans. More than this, they sailed straight into Spanish harbours and burned the merchant vessels lying at anchor ; and they lay in wait for Spanish ships coming from the New World, captured them, and bore their vast treasure of gold and silver back to England. There was no enemy to guard against except Spain, and even toward Spain England grew more and more fearless.
All this audacious freedom was reflected in the literature of the time, especially in the boldness with which English writers attempted anything and everything. This boldness was something entirely new in religious writings. Every middle-aged man in England could remember three religious revolutions, three times within the space of less than a quarter of a century when men who had not changed their faith to agree with that of their sovereign had been in danger of death at the stake. Religious poems had been careful and timid, but now they became frank and cheerful. Great numbers of ballads were written, but few of them were as good as the old ones ; for their chief object now was to tell of some recent event, that is, to be newspapers rather than poems. Of translations there seemed no end, translations not only from the Greek and Latin, but also from the Italian, for Italy was still the land cf culture and light. The Celtic love for stories could now be satisfied, for there were tales and romances from Italy, from the wonder-book of early English

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE that what is country was theirs. what is Queen loved her land and her subjects, and what is people of England were quick to feel what is new sense of harmony between what is ruler and what is ruled. England became rapidly stronger. Her sea-captains sailed fearlessly into what is Arctic and Pacific Oceans. More than this, they sailed straight into Spanish harbours and burned what is merchant vessels lying at anchor ; and they lay in wait for Spanish ships coming from what is New World, captured them, and bore their vast treasure of gold and silver back to England. There was no enemy to guard against except Spain, and even toward Spain England grew more and more fearless. All this audacious freedom was reflected in what is literature of what is time, especially in what is boldness with which English writers attempted anything and everything. This boldness was something entirely new in religious writings. Every middle-aged man in England where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 97 where is strong CHAPTER V SIXTEENTH CENTURY - RENAISSANCE AND EARLY ELIZABETHANS where is p align="justify" that what is country was theirs. what is Queen loved her land and her subjects, and what is people of England were quick to feel what is new sense of harmony between what is ruler and what is ruled. England became rapidly stronger. Her sea-captains sailed fearlessly into what is Arctic and Pacific Oceans. More than this, they sailed straight into Spanish harbours and burned what is merchant vessels lying at anchor ; and they lay in wait for Spanish ships coming from what is New World, captured them, and bore their vast treasure of gold and silver back to England. There was no enemy to guard against except Spain, and even toward Spain England grew more and more fearless. All this audacious freedom was reflected in what is literature of the time, especially in what is boldness with which English writers attempted anything and everything. This boldness was something entirely new in religious writings. Every middle-aged man in England could remember three religious revolutions, three times within what is space of less than a quarter of a century when men who had not changed their faith to agree with that of their sovereign had been in danger of what time is it at what is stake. Religious poems had been careful and timid, but now they became frank and cheerful. Great numbers of ballads were written, but few of them were as good as what is old ones ; for their chief object now was to tell of some recent event, that is, to be newspapers rather than poems. Of translations there seemed no end, translations not only from what is Greek and Latin, but also from what is Italian, for Italy was still what is land cf culture and light. what is Celtic what time is it for stories could now be satisfied, for there were tales and romances from Italy, from what is wonder-book of early English where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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