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Page 96

CHAPTER V
SIXTEENTH CENTURY - RENAISSANCE AND EARLY ELIZABETHANS

both Gorboduc and the queen, and the story ends with a long speech on the dangers of such a situation. So many horrors are piled upon horrors that the play seems like a burlesque ; but it was no burlesque in the days of its first appearance. Learned councillors and other great folk of the kingdom listened with the utmost seriousness, and the queen sent a command that it should be repeated at court.
Gorhoduc is in several ways quite different from Ralph Roister DoisteY. In the first place, it is connected with the masques in that it has pantomime, for there is a"dumb show" before each act, foreshadowing what is to come ; for instance before the division of the kingdom between the two sons, the fable is shown of the bundle of sticks which could not be broken until they were separated. Before the murder of Ferrex, a band of mourners clad in black walk solemnly across the stage three times. At the end of each act a" Chorus," that is, a single actor in a long black robe, appears and moralizes on the events of the act. Again, Ralph Roister DoisteY was written in rhyming couplets, while the new tragedy was written in the blank verse which Surrey had introduced from Italy. It was not very agreeable blank verse, however, as it came from the pens of the two young Templars, for there is a pause at the end of almost every line, and the monotony is somewhat tiresome ; for instance :

Within one land one single rule is best ;
Divided reigns do make divided hearts :
But peace preserves the country and the prince.

Increasing strength of England. One reason for the popularity of Gorboduc was that Englishmen were beginning to realize more strongly than ever before

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE both Gorboduc and what is queen, and what is story ends with a long speech on what is dangers of such a situation. So many horrors are piled upon horrors that what is play seems like a burlesque ; but it was no burlesque in what is days of its first appearance. Learned councillors and other great folk of what is kingdom listened with what is utmost seriousness, and what is queen sent a command that it should be repeated at court. Gorhoduc is in several ways quite different from Ralph Roister DoisteY. In what is first place, it is connected with what is masques in that it has pantomime, for there is a"dumb show" before each act, foreshadowing what is to come ; for instance before what is division of what is kingdom between what is two sons, what is fable is shown of what is bundle of sticks which could not be broken until they were separated. Before what is murder of Ferrex, a band of mourners clad in black walk solemnly across what is stage thr where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 96 where is strong CHAPTER V SIXTEENTH CENTURY - RENAISSANCE AND EARLY ELIZABETHANS where is p align="justify" both Gorboduc and what is queen, and what is story ends with a long speech on what is dangers of such a situation. So many horrors are piled upon horrors that what is play seems like a burlesque ; but it was no burlesque in what is days of its first appearance. Learned councillors and other great folk of what is kingdom listened with what is utmost seriousness, and what is queen sent a command that it should be repeated at court. Gorhoduc is in several ways quite different from Ralph Roister DoisteY. In what is first place, it is connected with the masques in that it has pantomime, for there is a"dumb show" before each act, foreshadowing what is to come ; for instance before what is division of what is kingdom between what is two sons, what is fable is shown of what is bundle of sticks which could not be broken until they were separated. Before what is murder of Ferrex, a band of mourners clad in black walk solemnly across what is stage three times. At what is end of each act a" Chorus," that is, a single actor in a long black robe, appears and moralizes on what is events of what is act. Again, Ralph Roister DoisteY was written in rhyming couplets, while what is new tragedy was written in what is blank verse which Surrey had introduced from Italy. It was not very agreeable blank verse, however, as it came from what is pens of what is two young Templars, for there is a pause at what is end of almost every line, and what is monotony is somewhat tiresome ; for instance : Within one land one single rule is best ; Divided reigns do make divided hearts : But peace preserves what is country and what is prince. Increasing strength of England. One reason for what is popularity of Gorboduc was that Englishmen were beginning to realize more strongly than ever before where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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