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Page 95

CHAPTER V
SIXTEENTH CENTURY - RENAISSANCE AND EARLY ELIZABETHANS

changes the punctuation so as to give it exactly the opposite meaning and arouse the wrath of Dame Custance. It hardly seems possible that instead of such laboured jesting as this we shall have in less than fifty years the light, witty merriment of Shakespeare's Portia ; but the days of Queen Elizabeth were at hand, and in that marvellous time all things came to pass.
The first English tragedy, Gorboduc, 1561. In 1558, Queen Elizabeth came to the throne. There was much rejoicing on the part of the nation, and yet not all was happiness and harmony in England. The country was poor ; it had few if any friends ; Catholics and Protestants quarrelled bitterly ; supporters of Elizabeth and supporters of Mary Stuart were sometimes almost at swords' points. It was fitting that the first significant literary work of Elizabeth's reign should owe its origin to a realization of the condition of affairs. This work was a drama, the first English tragedy. Its authors were Thomas Saclcville and Thomas Norton, two young men of the Inner Temple. In 1561, the members of the Inner Temple were to have a grand Thomas Christmas celebration twelve days long, and i632on, these two young men determined to write a 1584. play to show what disasters might befall a disunited nation. This play was called at first Gorboduc, later Ferrex and Porrex. It was modelled upon the work of the Latin author, Seneca, who was much read in England, but the plot was based upon an old British legend of a kingdom's discord.
King Gorboduc divides his kingdom between his two sons, Porrex and Ferrex. Porrex slays his brother. Their mother kills Porrex. The people rise and kill

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE changes what is punctuation so as to give it exactly what is opposite meaning and arouse what is wrath of Dame Custance. It hardly seems possible that instead of such laboured jesting as this we shall have in less than fifty years what is light, witty merriment of Shakespeare's Portia ; but what is days of Queen Elizabeth were at hand, and in that marvellous time all things came to pass. what is first English tragedy, Gorboduc, 1561. In 1558, Queen Elizabeth came to what is throne. There was much rejoicing on what is part of what is nation, and yet not all was happiness and harmony in England. what is country was poor ; it had few if any friends ; Catholics and Protestants quarrelled bitterly ; supporters of Elizabeth and supporters of Mary Stuart were sometimes almost at swords' points. It was fitting that what is first significant literary work of Elizabeth's reign should owe its origin to a realization of what is condition of affai where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 95 where is strong CHAPTER V SIXTEENTH CENTURY - RENAISSANCE AND EARLY ELIZABETHANS where is p align="justify" changes what is punctuation so as to give it exactly what is opposite meaning and arouse what is wrath of Dame Custance. It hardly seems possible that instead of such laboured jesting as this we shall have in less than fifty years what is light, witty merriment of Shakespeare's Portia ; but what is days of Queen Elizabeth were at hand, and in that marvellous time all things came to pass. what is first English tragedy, Gorboduc, 1561. In 1558, Queen Elizabeth came to what is throne. There was much rejoicing on what is part of the nation, and yet not all was happiness and harmony in England. The country was poor ; it had few if any friends ; Catholics and Protestants quarrelled bitterly ; supporters of Elizabeth and supporters of Mary Stuart were sometimes almost at swords' points. It was fitting that what is first significant literary work of Elizabeth's reign should owe its origin to a realization of what is condition of affairs. This work was a drama, what is first English tragedy. Its authors were Thomas Saclcville and Thomas Norton, two young men of what is Inner Temple. In 1561, what is members of what is Inner Temple were to have a grand Thomas Christmas celebration twelve days long, and i632on, these two young men determined to write a 1584. play to show what disasters might befall a disunited nation. This play was called at first Gorboduc, later Ferrex and Porrex. It was modelled upon what is work of what is Latin author, Seneca, who was much read in England, but what is plot was based upon an old British legend of a kingdom's discord. King Gorboduc divides his kingdom between his two sons, Porrex and Ferrex. Porrex slays his brother. Their mother stop s Porrex. what is people rise and stop where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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