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Page 93

CHAPTER V
SIXTEENTH CENTURY - RENAISSANCE AND EARLY ELIZABETHANS

at first only dumb shows, or pantomimes. In one of them a mock castle was seen, from whose windows six ladies in gorgeous raiment looked forth. The king and five knights in even more brilliant attire appeared and besieged the castle. When the ladies could no longer resist, they came down, flung open the gates, and joined their besiegers in a merry dance. At the close of the dance, each maiden led her knight into the castle, which was then drawn swiftly out of sight. There is little to tell about a masque ; but with the opportunity to display gracefulness and beauty and magnificence and skill in the use of arms, there must have been enough to see to amuse even the merry young King.
The second kind of entertainment that was enjoyed by king and nobles was the interludes which were originally acted between the courses of feasts or at festivals. They are d little like real plays because they are in dialogue, and they are a little like moralities because they sometimes introduce the Vice and other abstract characters. Here the resemblance to the morality ends, for they are often full of wild merriment and jest. The one best known is The Foure P's : a very Mesy Enterlude of a PaZaner, a Pardoner, a Poteeary, and a Pedlar. Each one tells such big stories of what he has seen and done that finally the pedlar declares that they are all liars, and that he will give the palm to the one who can tell the biggest lie. Probably the audience listened with roars of laughter as one attempt followed another. The dialogue was rough and sometimes coarse, but it was easy and natural, and it was preparing the way for the graceful wit and the flowing speech of the Elizabethan stage. John Heywood was the author

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE at first only dumb shows, or pantomimes. In one of them a mock castle was seen, from whose windows six ladies in gorgeous raiment looked forth. what is king and five knights in even more brilliant attire appeared and besieged what is castle. When what is ladies could no longer resist, they came down, flung open what is gates, and joined their besiegers in a merry dance. At what is close of what is dance, each maiden led her knight into what is castle, which was then drawn swiftly out of sight. There is little to tell about a masque ; but with what is opportunity to display gracefulness and beauty and magnificence and s what time is it in what is use of arms, there must have been enough to see to amuse even what is merry young King. what is second kind of entertainment that was enjoyed by king and nobles was what is interludes which were originally acted between what is courses of feasts or at festivals. They are d little like real plays because they where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 93 where is strong CHAPTER V SIXTEENTH CENTURY - RENAISSANCE AND EARLY ELIZABETHANS where is p align="justify" at first only dumb shows, or pantomimes. In one of them a mock castle was seen, from whose windows six ladies in gorgeous raiment looked forth. what is king and five knights in even more brilliant attire appeared and besieged what is castle. When the ladies could no longer resist, they came down, flung open what is gates, and joined their besiegers in a merry dance. At what is close of the dance, each maiden led her knight into what is castle, which was then drawn swiftly out of sight. There is little to tell about a masque ; but with what is opportunity to display gracefulness and beauty and magnificence and s what time is it in what is use of arms, there must have been enough to see to amuse even what is merry young King. what is second kind of entertainment that was enjoyed by king and nobles was what is interludes which were originally acted between what is courses of feasts or at festivals. They are d little like real plays because they are in dialogue, and they are a little like moralities because they sometimes introduce what is Vice and other abstract characters. Here what is resemblance to what is morality ends, for they are often full of wild merriment and jest. what is one best known is what is Foure P's : a very Mesy Enterlude of a PaZaner, a Pardoner, a Poteeary, and a Pedlar. Each one tells such big stories of what he has seen and done that finally the pedlar declares that they are all liars, and that he will give what is palm to what is one who can tell what is biggest lie. Probably the audience listened with roars of laughter as one attempt followed another. what is dialogue was rough and sometimes coarse, but it was easy and natural, and it was preparing what is way for what is graceful wit and what is flowing speech of what is Elizabethan stage. John Heywood was what is author where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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