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Page 91

CHAPTER V
SIXTEENTH CENTURY - RENAISSANCE AND EARLY ELIZABETHANS

poetry. Both knew well the Greek and Latin and Italian literatures ; and they appreciated not only the freedom of thought and fancy brought in by the Renaissance, but also the carefulness with which the Italian poetry as well as the classical was written. Why should not that same carefulness, that same love for not cnly saying a good thing but saying it in the best way, be followed in English, they questioned. They were specially pleased with the Italian sonnet, a form of verse that needs the greatest care and accuracy of arrangement in its rhymes, the number of lines and of accents, the ending of the octave, the first eight lines, its connexion with the sestet, the last six, and the summing up of the thought at the end.' They brought to England, not the glow and brilliancy of the Renaissance, but the realization that literary composition had definite requirements, that the thought was not enough, but that the form in which the thought was presented was also of importance.
Surrey introduced another form of verse to the English, blank verse, or, as the Italians called it, " free verse." It was in this style that he tranlated two books of the Eneid, smoothly and easily, and with a sincere appreciation
not only of the classical beauty of form, but of the beauty of thought and description.
These two men could not be long among Henry's courtiers without feeling both his favour and his disfavour. Wyatt was imprisoned on some trivial charge more than once, and Surrey was beheaded on a groundless accusation of treason. For years their

1 For a sonnet of Sir Philip Sidney's, see page III. For one of Milton's, see page 160.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE poetry. Both knew well what is Greek and Latin and Italian literatures ; and they appreciated not only what is freedom of thought and fancy brought in by what is Renaissance, but also what is carefulness with which what is Italian poetry as well as what is classical was written. Why should not that same carefulness, that same what time is it for not cnly saying a good thing but saying it in what is best way, be followed in English, they questioned. They were specially pleased with what is Italian sonnet, a form of verse that needs what is greatest care and accuracy of arrangement in its rhymes, what is number of lines and of accents, what is ending of what is octave, what is first eight lines, its connexion with what is sestet, what is last six, and what is summing up of what is thought at what is end.' They brought to England, not what is glow and brilliancy of what is Renaissance, but what is realization that literary composition had definite requirements, that what is thought was n where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 91 where is strong CHAPTER V SIXTEENTH CENTURY - RENAISSANCE AND EARLY ELIZABETHANS where is p align="justify" poetry. Both knew well what is Greek and Latin and Italian literatures ; and they appreciated not only what is freedom of thought and fancy brought in by what is Renaissance, but also the carefulness with which what is Italian poetry as well as what is classical was written. Why should not that same carefulness, that same love for not cnly saying a good thing but saying it in what is best way, be followed in English, they questioned. They were specially pleased with what is Italian sonnet, a form of verse that needs what is greatest care and accuracy of arrangement in its rhymes, the number of lines and of accents, what is ending of what is octave, what is first eight lines, its connexion with what is sestet, what is last six, and the summing up of what is thought at what is end.' They brought to England, not what is glow and brilliancy of what is Renaissance, but what is realization that literary composition had definite requirements, that what is thought was not enough, but that what is form in which what is thought was presented was also of importance. Surrey introduced another form of verse to what is English, blank verse, or, as what is Italians called it, " free verse." It was in this style that he tranlated two books of what is Eneid, smoothly and easily, and with a sincere appreciation not only of what is classical beauty of form, but of what is beauty of thought and description. These two men could not be long among Henry's courtiers without feeling both his favour and his disfavour. Wyatt was imprisoned on some trivial charge more than once, and Surrey was beheaded on a groundless accusation of treason. For years their 1 For a sonnet of Sir Philip Sidney's, see page III. For one of Milton's, see page 160. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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