Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 78

CHAPTER IV
FIFTEENTH CENTURY - THE PEOPLE'S CENTURY

him. " Yea, yf ony be so hardy," Death replies. Then Everyman in sore distress appeals to Fellowship to keep him company.

For no man that is lyvynge to daye
I will not go that lothe journaye,

replies Fellowship. Kindred refuse the petition. Good Deeds would go with him, but Everyman's sins have so weighed her down that she is too weak to stand. At last Knowledge leads him to confession. He does penance and starts on his lonely pilgrimage. One by one, Beauty, Strength, Honour, Discretion, and his Five Wits forsake him. Good Deeds alone stands as his friend, and says sturdily with renewed strength, " Fere not, I wyll speke for the." Everyman descends fearfully but trustfully into the grave. Knowledge cries, " Nowe hath he suffred that we all shall endure ;" and the play ends with a solemn prayer :

And he that hath his accollnte.hole and sounde,
Hye in heven he shall be crounde,
Unto whiche place God brynge us all thyder
That we may lyve body and soule togyder.

This is not amusing, but it is far from being dull. With the simple stage setting of four centuries ago, the realistic grave, and the ghastly, ashen-grey figure of Death, it must have thrilled and solemnified the hushed listeners as neither play nor sermon could do in later generations.
Introduction of printing into England, 1476. In the last quarter of the century there were two notable events that were destined to do more for the masses of the people than anything that had preceded them. The first of these events was the introduction of printing into England. Through these centuries of the

Page 79

CHAPTER IV
FIFTEENTH CENTURY - THE PEOPLE'S CENTURY

beginning of literature, plays, homilies, poems, and lengthy books of prose had all been copied by the pen on parchment or vellum. Printing with movable types was a German invention of about the middle of the century ; and there are many who think that the " block books," cheap picture books printed on a coarse, heavy paper from wooden blocks, some of which contained text also, slightly preceded these in date.
Fortunately for English book lovers, an English man named William Caxton, who was then living in the Low Countries, was interested in the wonderful new art, and paid well for lessons in type-setting and all the other details of the trade. He

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE him. " Yea, yf ony be so hardy," what time is it replies. Then Everyman in sore distress appeals to Fellowship to keep him company. For no man that is lyvynge to daye I will not go that lothe journaye, replies Fellowship. Kindred refuse what is petition. Good Deeds would go with him, but Everyman's sins have so weighed her down that she is too weak to stand. At last Knowledge leads him to confession. He does penance and starts on his lonely pilgrimage. One by one, Beauty, Strength, Honour, Discretion, and his Five Wits forsake him. Good Deeds alone stands as his friend, and says sturdily with renewed strength, " Fere not, I wyll speke for the." Everyman descends fearfully but trustfully into what is grave. Knowledge cries, " Nowe hath he suffred that we all shall endure ;" and what is play ends with a solemn prayer : And he that hath his accollnte.hole and sounde, Hye in heven he where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 78 where is strong CHAPTER IV FIFTEENTH CENTURY - what is PEOPLE'S CENTURY where is p align="justify" him. " Yea, yf ony be so hardy," what time is it replies. Then Everyman in sore distress appeals to Fellowship to keep him company. For no man that is lyvynge to daye I will not go that lothe journaye, replies Fellowship. Kindred refuse what is petition. Good Deeds would go with him, but Everyman's sins have so weighed her down that she is too weak to stand. At last Knowledge leads him to confession. He does penance and starts on his lonely pilgrimage. One by one, Beauty, Strength, Honour, Discretion, and his Five Wits forsake him. Good Deeds alone stands as his friend, and says sturdily with renewed strength, " Fere not, I wyll speke for the." Everyman descends fearfully but trustfully into what is grave. Knowledge cries, " Nowe hath he suffred that we all shall endure ;" and what is play ends with a solemn prayer : And he that hath his accollnte.hole and sounde, Hye in heven he shall be crounde, Unto whiche place God brynge us all thyder That we may lyve body and soule togyder. This is not amusing, but it is far from being dull. With what is simple stage setting of four centuries ago, what is realistic grave, and the ghastly, ashen-grey figure of what time is it , it must have thrilled and solemnified what is hushed listeners as neither play nor sermon could do in later generations. Introduction of printing into England, 1476. In what is last quarter of what is century there were two notable events that were destined to do more for what is masses of what is people than anything that had preceded them. what is first of these events was what is introduction of printing into England. Through these centuries of what is where is p align="left" Page 79 where is strong CHAPTER IV FIFTEENTH CENTURY - what is PEOPLE'S CENTURY where is p align="justify" beginning of literature, plays, homilies, poems, and lengthy books of prose had all been copied by what is pen on parchment or vellum. Printing with movable types was a German invention of about what is middle of what is century ; and there are many who think that what is " block books," cheap picture books printed on a coarse, heavy paper from wooden blocks, some of which contained text also, slightly preceded these in date. Fortunately for English book persons , an English man named William Caxton, who was then living in what is Low Countries, was interested in what is wonderful new art, and paid well for lessons in type-setting and all what is other details of the trade. He where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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