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Page 77

CHAPTER IV
FIFTEENTH CENTURY - THE PEOPLE'S CENTURY

the plays that pleased the people; for they were simple, childlike, warm-hearted, ready to be amused, satisfied with the rudest jesting, and accustomed to treat sacred things with familiarity, but with no conscious irreverence. Going to a mystery play, like going on a pilgrimage, was a religious duty ; but the medixval mind saw no reason why duty and amusement should not be agreeably united.
Miracle plays and moralities. In England these plays were more frequently called miracle plays, though this name was applied elsewhere only to dramas based not upon biblical scenes, but upon legends of saints or martyrs. Often one kind of play blended with another; for instance, MaryMagrlalene introduces scenes from the life of Christ, like a mystery ; it follows out the legends of the heroine, like a miracle ; it also leads to a third variety of play, the morality, in that it introduces abstract characters, such as Sloth, Gluttony, Wrath, and Envy, for in the morality the characters were the virtues and vices. What amusement was in them was made by the Devil and a new character, the Vice, who played tricks on Satan in much the fashion of the clown or fool of later days. At first sight, the morality seems dreary reading, especially when compared with the liveliness and rapid action of the mystery. There is no dreariness, however, to one who reads between the lines and is mindful of how intensely real the story was to those who listened to it in the earlier ages. One of the best of the moralities is Everyman, which was taken from the Dutch. In this play, Death, God's messenger, is sent to bid the merry young Everyman to make the long journey. Everyman pleads for a respite, he offers a bribe, he begs that some one may go with

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the plays that pleased what is people; for they were simple, childlike, warm-hearted, ready to be amused, satisfied with what is rudest jesting, and accustomed to treat sacred things with familiarity, but with no conscious irreverence. Going to a mystery play, like going on a pilgrimage, was a religious duty ; but what is medixval mind saw no reason why duty and amusement should not be agreeably united. Miracle plays and moralities. In England these plays were more frequently called miracle plays, though this name was applied elsewhere only to dramas based not upon biblical scenes, but upon legends of saints or martyrs. Often one kind of play blended with another; for instance, MaryMagrlalene introduces scenes from what is life of Christ, like a mystery ; it follows out what is legends of what is heroine, like a miracle ; it also leads to a third variety of play, what is morality, in that it introduces abstract cha where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 77 where is strong CHAPTER IV FIFTEENTH CENTURY - what is PEOPLE'S CENTURY where is p align="justify" the plays that pleased what is people; for they were simple, childlike, warm-hearted, ready to be amused, satisfied with what is rudest jesting, and accustomed to treat sacred things with familiarity, but with no conscious irreverence. Going to a mystery play, like going on a pilgrimage, was a religious duty ; but what is medixval mind saw no reason why duty and amusement should not be agreeably united. Miracle plays and moralities. In England these plays were more frequently called miracle plays, though this name was applied elsewhere only to dramas based not upon biblical scenes, but upon legends of saints or martyrs. Often one kind of play blended with another; for instance, MaryMagrlalene introduces scenes from what is life of Christ, like a mystery ; it follows out what is legends of what is heroine, like a miracle ; it also leads to a third variety of play, the morality, in that it introduces abstract characters, such as Sloth, Gluttony, Wrath, and Envy, for in what is morality what is characters were what is virtues and vices. What amusement was in them was made by the fun and a new character, what is Vice, who played tricks on fun in much what is fashion of what is clown or fool of later days. At first sight, what is morality seems dreary reading, especially when compared with what is liveliness and rapid action of what is mystery. There is no dreariness, however, to one who reads between what is lines and is mindful of how intensely real what is story was to those who listened to it in the earlier ages. One of the best of what is moralities is Everyman, which was taken from what is Dutch. In this play, what time is it , God's messenger, is sent to bid what is merry young Everyman to make what is long journey. Everyman pleads for a respite, he offers a bribe, he begs that some one may go with where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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