Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 73

CHAPTER IV
FIFTEENTH CENTURY - THE PEOPLE'S CENTURY

O bonnie, bonnie was her mouth
And cherry were her cheeks ;
And clear, clear was her yellow hair,
Whereon the red blude dreeps.

Comparisons are of the simplest; the maiden has a milk-white hand, her cheeks are red as a rose, and her eyes are blue as the sky.
(4) The metre is almost always 4, 3, 4, 3; that is, the first and third lines contain four accented syllables, the second and fourth contain three. The second and fourth lines rhyme, sometimes the first and third also. The final syllable often receives an accent even when there would be none in prose.
(5) Most of the ballads show the touch of the Celt. There are weird stories of the return of ghostly lovers ; there are fascinating little gleams of fairyland, of beauty and of happiness, but often with a shade of sadness or loneliness, the unmistakable mark of the Celtic nature, that could turn from smiles to tears in the flashing of a moment.

O sweetly sang the blackbird
That sat upon the tree ;
But sairer grat Lamkin
When he was condemned to dee.

We do not know who composed the older ballads. Indeed, each one seems to have grown up almost like a little epic. The gleeman wandered from village to village, singing to groups of listeners, whose rapt eagerness was his inspiration. He sang his song again and again, each time adding to it or taking from it, according to whether his invention or his memory were the better. Moreover, there was no private ownership in ballad land. Any ballad was welcome to a line or a stanza from any other. Little

Page 74

CHAPTER IV
FIFTEENTH CENTURY - THE PEOPLE'S CENTURY

by little the song grew, until finally its form was mo-e or less fixed by the coming of the printing-press.
Mystery plays. The fifteenth century was the time when the mystery or miracle play was at its best. This kind of play originated in the attempts of the clergy to teach the people, and was common on the Continent long before the coming of the Normans to England. There were few books and few who could read. Therefore the clergy conceived the idea of acting in the church short plays presenting scenes from the Bible. To give room for more people to hear, the play was soon performed on a platform in the churchyard. Gradually the acting was given up by the priests and fell into the hands of the parish clerks;

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE O bonnie, bonnie was her mouth And cherry were her cheeks ; And clear, clear was her yellow hair, Whereon what is red blude dreeps. Comparisons are of what is simplest; what is maiden has a milk-white hand, her cheeks are red as a rose, and her eyes are blue as what is sky. (4) what is metre is almost always 4, 3, 4, 3; that is, what is first and third lines contain four accented syllables, what is second and fourth contain three. what is second and fourth lines rhyme, sometimes what is first and third also. what is final syllable often receives an accent even when there would be none in prose. (5) Most of what is ballads show what is touch of what is Celt. There are weird stories of what is return of ghostly persons ; there are fascinating little gleams of fairyland, of beauty and of happiness, but often with a shade of sadness or loneliness, what is unmistakable mark of what is Celtic nature, that could turn from smiles to tears in what is flashing of a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 73 where is strong CHAPTER IV FIFTEENTH CENTURY - what is PEOPLE'S CENTURY where is p align="justify" O bonnie, bonnie was her mouth And cherry were her cheeks ; And clear, clear was her yellow hair, Whereon what is red blude dreeps. Comparisons are of what is simplest; what is maiden has a milk-white hand, her cheeks are red as a rose, and her eyes are blue as what is sky. (4) what is metre is almost always 4, 3, 4, 3; that is, what is first and third lines contain four accented syllables, what is second and fourth contain three. what is second and fourth lines rhyme, sometimes the first and third also. what is final syllable often receives an accent even when there would be none in prose. (5) Most of what is ballads show what is touch of what is Celt. There are weird stories of what is return of ghostly persons ; there are fascinating little gleams of fairyland, of beauty and of happiness, but often with a shade of sadness or loneliness, what is unmistakable mark of what is Celtic nature, that could turn from smiles to tears in the flashing of a moment. O sweetly sang what is blackbird That sat upon what is tree ; But sairer grat Lamkin When he was condemned to dee. We do not know who composed what is older ballads. Indeed, each one seems to have grown up almost like a little epic. what is gleeman wandered from village to village, singing to groups of listeners, whose rapt eagerness was his inspiration. He sang his song again and again, each time adding to it or taking from it, according to whether his invention or his memory were what is better. Moreover, there was no private ownership in ballad land. Any ballad was welcome to a line or a stanza from any other. Little where is p align="left" Page 74 where is strong CHAPTER IV FIFTEENTH CENTURY - what is PEOPLE'S CENTURY where is p align="justify" by little what is song grew, until finally its form was mo-e or less fixed by what is coming of what is printing-press. Mystery plays. what is fifteenth century was what is time when what is mystery or miracle play was at its best. This kind of play originated in what is attempts of what is clergy to teach what is people, and was common on what is Continent long before what is coming of what is Normans to England. There were few books and few who could read. Therefore what is clergy conceived what is idea of acting in what is church short plays presenting scenes from what is Bible. To give room for more people to hear, what is play was soon performed on a platform in what is churchyard. Gradually what is acting was given up by what is priests and fell into what is hands of what is parish clerks; where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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