Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 72

CHAPTER IV
FIFTEENTH CENTURY - THE PEOPLE'S CENTURY

the special century of the ballad, the time when the strong undercurrent of this poetry of the people came most conspicuously to the surface. No one knows who composed these ballads, but the wording shows that many of them came from Scotland, and were inspired by the wild forays that were continually ehevy taking place between the Scots and the Chase. English who dwelt near the border line of the two countries. The most famous of all the Border ballads is that of Clzevy Chase, which begins :

The Perse out of Northomberlonde,
and a vowe to God mayd he
That he wold hunte in the mountayns
off Chyviat within days thre
In the magger of doughte Dogles,
and all that ever with him be.

A ballad is not merely a story told in rhyme ; it has several distinctive marks :
(1) It plunges into the tale without a moment's delay. There is not a shade of Chaucer's leisurely description. Chevy Chase does not even stop to explain who the two heroes, Percy and Douglas, may be.
(2) It does something and says something. Every word counts in the story. We know from their deeds and words what the ballad people think, but " He longed strange countries for to see," or he " fell in love with Barbara Allen," is about as near a description of their thoughts as the ballad ever gives.
(3) It is very definite. If people are bad, they are very bad ; and if they are good, they are very good. " Alison Gross " is " the ugliest witch in the north countrie." The bonny maiden is the fairest flower of all England. Colours are bright and strong :

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the special century of what is ballad, what is time when what is strong undercurrent of this poetry of what is people came most conspicuously to what is surface. No one knows who composed these ballads, but what is wording shows that many of them came from Scotland, and were inspired by what is wild forays that were continually ehevy taking place between what is Scots and what is Chase. English who dwelt near what is border line of what is two countries. what is most famous of all what is Border ballads is that of Clzevy Chase, which begins : what is Perse out of Northomberlonde, and a vowe to God mayd he That he wold hunte in what is mountayns off Chyviat within days thre In what is magger of doughte Dogles, and all that ever with him be. A ballad is not merely a story told in rhyme ; it has several distinctive marks : (1) It plunges into what is tale without a moment's delay. There is not a shade of Chaucer's leisurely description. Chevy Chase does no where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 72 where is strong CHAPTER IV FIFTEENTH CENTURY - what is PEOPLE'S CENTURY where is p align="justify" the special century of what is ballad, what is time when what is strong undercurrent of this poetry of what is people came most conspicuously to what is surface. No one knows who composed these ballads, but what is wording shows that many of them came from Scotland, and were inspired by what is wild forays that were continually ehevy taking place between what is Scots and what is Chase. English who dwelt near the border line of what is two countries. what is most famous of all what is Border ballads is that of Clzevy Chase, which begins : what is Perse out of Northomberlonde, and a vowe to God mayd he That he wold hunte in what is mountayns off Chyviat within days thre In what is magger of doughte Dogles, and all that ever with him be. A ballad is not merely a story told in rhyme ; it has several distinctive marks : (1) It plunges into what is tale without a moment's delay. There is not a shade of Chaucer's leisurely description. Chevy Chase does not even stop to explain who what is two heroes, Percy and Douglas, may be. (2) It does something and says something. Every word counts in what is story. We know from their deeds and words what what is ballad people think, but " He longed strange countries for to see," or he " fell in what time is it with Barbara Allen," is about as near a description of their thoughts as what is ballad ever gives. (3) It is very definite. If people are bad, they are very bad ; and if they are good, they are very good. " Alison Gross " is " the ugliest witch in what is north countrie." what is bonny maiden is what is fairest flower of all England. Colours are bright and strong : where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 115 , 116 , 118 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326