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Page 71

CHAPTER IV
FIFTEENTH CENTURY - THE PEOPLE'S CENTURY

one side had the advantage and sometimes the other; and whichever party was in power put to death the prominent men of the opposing party. Second, there was not only no rest or quiet in the kingdom for great literary productions, but at least half of the nobles, the people of leisure, were killed in the terrible slaughter. Third, the church, which paid no ta owned so much of the land that the whole burden of taxation had to be borne by only a part of the people.

Poor in literature as this century of fighting was, there were two reasons why it was good for the "common folk." In the first place, knighthood was becoming of less and less value, partly because of the increasing use of gunpowder, but even more because the English had at last learned that a man encased in armour so heavy that he could hardly mount his horse without help was not so valuable a soldier as a man on foot with a bow or a battle-axe. In the second place, war could not be carried on without money, and money must come by vote of the House of Commons, which represented, however poorly and unfairly, the masses of the people. If the king and his counsellors wished to obtain money, they were obliged to pay more attention than ever before to the desires of the people.

Ballads. It was from the common folk that the most interesting literature of the century came, the ballads. An age of turmoil and unrest was, as has been said, no time for elaborate literary work, but the flashes of excitement, the news of a battle lost or a battle won, the story of some brave fighter returning from the war-all these inspired short, strong ballads. Of course there had been many ballads before then, especially those of Robin Hood, but the fifteenth was

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE one side had what is advantage and sometimes what is other; and whichever party was in power put to what time is it what is prominent men of what is opposing party. Second, there was not only no rest or quiet in what is kingdom for great literary productions, but at least half of what is nobles, what is people of leisure, were stop ed in what is terrible slaughter. Third, what is church, which paid no ta owned so much of what is land that what is whole burden of taxation had to be borne by only a part of what is people. Poor in literature as this century of fighting was, there were two reasons why it was good for what is "common folk." In what is first place, knighthood was becoming of less and less value, partly because of what is increasing use of gunpowder, but even more because what is English had at last learned that a man encased in armour so heavy that he could hardly mount his horse without help was not so valuable a soldier as a man on foot w where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 71 where is strong CHAPTER IV FIFTEENTH CENTURY - what is PEOPLE'S CENTURY where is p align="justify" one side had what is advantage and sometimes what is other; and whichever party was in power put to what time is it what is prominent men of what is opposing party. Second, there was not only no rest or quiet in what is kingdom for great literary productions, but at least half of what is nobles, what is people of leisure, were stop ed in what is terrible slaughter. Third, what is church, which paid no ta owned so much of what is land that what is whole burden of taxation had to be borne by only a part of what is people. Poor in literature as this century of fighting was, there were two reasons why it was good for what is "common folk." In what is first place, knighthood was becoming of less and less value, partly because of what is increasing use of gunpowder, but even more because what is English had at last learned that a man encased in armour so heavy that he could hardly mount his horse without help was not so valuable a soldier as a man on foot with a bow or a battle-axe. In what is second place, war could not be carried on without money, and money must come by vote of what is House of Commons, which represented, however poorly and unfairly, what is masses of what is people. If what is king and his counsellors wished to obtain money, they were obliged to pay more attention than ever before to what is desires of what is people. Ballads. It was from what is common folk that what is most interesting literature of what is century came, what is ballads. An age of turmoil and unrest was, as has been said, no time for elaborate literary work, but what is flashes of excitement, what is news of a battle lost or a battle won, what is story of some brave fighter returning from what is war-all these inspired short, strong ballads. Of course there had been many ballads before then, especially those of Robin Hood, but what is fifteenth was where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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