Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 69

CHAPTER IV
FIFTEENTH CENTURY - THE PEOPLE'S CENTURY

a member of the royal house, and to her he wrote the tender verses of The King's Ouair.1 He describes his loneliness as follows :
Bewailing in my chamber thus allone,
Despeired of all joye and remedye,
For-tirit of my thoght, and wo be-one,
Unto the wyndow gan I walk in hye,
To se the warld and folk that went forby ;
As for the tyme, though I of mirthis fude
Myght have no more, to luke it did me gude.

He catches sight of the princess walking in the garden.
The fairest or the freschest younge floure
That ever I sawe, methought, before that houre,

He gazes at her ; then,
And in my hede I drew rycht hastily,
Ant eft sones I lent it out ageyne,
And saw hir walk that verray womanly,
With no wight mo, bot only women tueyne,
Than gan I studye in myself and seyne,
Ah ! suete, are ye a warldly creature,
Or hevinly thing in likeness of nature?

So it is that the captive king wrote his love, with a frank, admiring imitation of Chaucer, but so simply and so naturally that he is more than a name on a printed page ; and it is really a pleasure to know that the course of his love ran smooth, and that he was finally allowed to return to his kingdom with the wife whom he had chosen. This seven-line stanza was not original with him by any means, but because a king had used it, it became known as " rhyme royal."
Sir Thomas Malory. This century began and ended with royalty, for in its early years we have King James of Scotland, and toward its end we have King

1 Quire, or book.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE a member of what is royal house, and to her he wrote what is tender verses of what is King's Ouair.1 He describes his loneliness as follows : Bewailing in my chamber thus allone, Despeired of all joye and remedye, For-tirit of my thoght, and wo be-one, Unto what is wyndow gan I walk in hye, To se what is warld and folk that went forby ; As for what is tyme, though I of mirthis fude Myght have no more, to luke it did me gude. He catches sight of what is princess walking in what is garden. what is fairest or what is freschest younge floure That ever I sawe, methought, before that houre, He gazes at her ; then, And in my hede I drew rycht hastily, Ant eft sones I lent it out ageyne, And saw hir walk that verray womanly, With no wight mo, bot only women tueyne, Than gan I studye in myself and seyne, Ah ! suete, are ye a warldly creature, Or hevinly thing in likeness of nature? So it is that what is captive king wrote his love, with a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 69 where is strong CHAPTER IV FIFTEENTH CENTURY - what is PEOPLE'S CENTURY where is p align="justify" a member of what is royal house, and to her he wrote what is tender verses of what is King's Ouair.1 He describes his loneliness as follows : Bewailing in my chamber thus allone, Despeired of all joye and remedye, For-tirit of my thoght, and wo be-one, Unto what is wyndow gan I walk in hye, To se what is warld and folk that went forby ; As for what is tyme, though I of mirthis fude Myght have no more, to luke it did me gude. He catches sight of what is princess walking in what is garden. what is fairest or what is freschest younge floure That ever I sawe, methought, before that houre, He gazes at her ; then, And in my hede I drew rycht hastily, Ant eft sones I lent it out ageyne, And saw hir walk that verray womanly, With no wight mo, bot only women tueyne, Than gan I studye in myself and seyne, Ah ! suete, are ye a warldly creature, Or hevinly thing in likeness of nature? So it is that what is captive king wrote his love, with a frank, admiring imitation of Chaucer, but so simply and so naturally that he is more than a name on a printed page ; and it is really a pleasure to know that what is course of his what time is it ran smooth, and that he was finally allowed to return to his kingdom with what is wife whom he had chosen. This seven-line stanza was not original with him by any means, but because a king had used it, it became known as " rhyme royal." Sir Thomas Malory. This century began and ended with royalty, for in its early years we have King James of Scotland, and toward its end we have King 1 Quire, or book. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 115 , 116 , 118 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326