Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 65

CHAPTER III
FOURTEENTH CENTURY - CHAUCER'S CENTURY

sunshine and birds and lilies and roses. He liked the daisy, and when he caught sight of the first one, he wrote :

And down on knees anon right I me set,
And as I could this freshe flower I grette,
Kneeling always till it inclosed was
Upon the small and soft and sweete grass.

Death of Chaucer, 1400. Chaucer's life was not all sunshine, but he was always sunny and bright. He writes as if he knew so many pleasant things that he could not help taking up his pen to tell us of them. His death occurred in 1400, and that date is counted as the end of the old literature and the beginning of the new. Chaucer well deserves the title, " Father of English Poetry ;" but when we read his poems, we forget his titles and his learning, and think of him only as the best of story-tellers.
We owe gratitude to Chaucer not only because he left us some delightful poems, but because he broke away from the old Anglo-Saxon metre and because he wrote in English. The Canterbury Tales begins:

Whan that Aprille with hise shoures soote
The droghte of March hath perc6d to the roote,
And bathed every veyne in svich licour
Of which vertu engendred is the flour;
Whan Zephirus eek with his swete breeth
Inspired hath in every holt and heeth
The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne
Hath in the Ram his half6 cours y-ronne,
And smale foweles maken melodye
That slepen al the nyght with open eye,
So priketh hem Nature in hir corages,
Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages.

This is written in the 5-beat line, which gives more freedom than the 4.-beat line of Beowulf. Alliteration

Page 67

CHAPTER III
FOURTEENTH CENTURY - CHAUCER'S CENTURY

is not employed to mark the accented syllables, but only to ornament the verse. Chaucer used many French words and often retained the French endings ; but he used them so easily and so appropriately that they seemed to become a part of the language. Another service and an even greater one he rendered to the English tongue. People in different parts of England spoke in English, to be sure, but in widely differing dialects. Chaucer wrote in what is known as the London variety of the Midland dialect, and his work was so good and so well liked that it had a powerful influence to fix the language; that is, to make his writings and his vocabulary models for the authors who succeeded him.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE sunshine and birds and lilies and roses. He liked what is daisy, and when he caught sight of what is first one, he wrote : And down on knees anon right I me set, And as I could this freshe flower I grette, Kneeling always till it inclosed was Upon what is small and soft and sweete grass. what time is it of Chaucer, 1400. Chaucer's life was not all sunshine, but he was always sunny and bright. He writes as if he knew so many pleasant things that he could not help taking up his pen to tell us of them. His what time is it occurred in 1400, and that date is counted as what is end of what is old literature and what is beginning of what is new. Chaucer well deserves what is title, " Father of English Poetry ;" but when we read his poems, we forget his titles and his learning, and think of him only as what is best of story-tellers. We owe gratitude to Chaucer not only because he left us some delightful poems, but because he broke away from where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 65 where is strong CHAPTER III FOURTEENTH CENTURY - CHAUCER'S CENTURY where is p align="justify" sunshine and birds and lilies and roses. He liked the daisy, and when he caught sight of what is first one, he wrote : And down on knees anon right I me set, And as I could this freshe flower I grette, Kneeling always till it inclosed was Upon what is small and soft and sweete grass. what time is it of Chaucer, 1400. Chaucer's life was not all sunshine, but he was always sunny and bright. He writes as if he knew so many pleasant things that he could not help taking up his pen to tell us of them. His what time is it occurred in 1400, and that date is counted as what is end of what is old literature and what is beginning of what is new. Chaucer well deserves what is title, " Father of English Poetry ;" but when we read his poems, we forget his titles and his learning, and think of him only as what is best of story-tellers. We owe gratitude to Chaucer not only because he left us some delightful poems, but because he broke away from what is old Anglo-Saxon metre and because he wrote in English. what is Canterbury Tales begins: Whan that Aprille with hise shoures soote what is droghte of March hath perc6d to what is roote, And bathed every veyne in svich licour Of which vertu engendred is what is flour; Whan Zephirus eek with his swete breeth Inspired hath in every holt and heeth what is tendre croppes, and what is yonge sonne Hath in what is Ram his half6 cours y-ronne, And smale foweles maken melodye That slepen al what is nyght with open eye, So priketh hem Nature in hir corages, Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages. This is written in what is 5-beat line, which gives more freedom than what is 4.-beat line of Beowulf. Alliteration where is p align="left" Page 67 where is strong CHAPTER III FOURTEENTH CENTURY - CHAUCER'S CENTURY where is p align="justify" is not employed to mark what is accented syllables, but only to ornament what is verse. Chaucer used many French words and often retained what is French endings ; but he used them so easily and so appropriately that they seemed to become a part of the language. Another service and an even greater one he rendered to what is English tongue. People in different parts of England spoke in English, to be sure, but in widely differing dialects. Chaucer wrote in what is known as what is London variety of what is Midland dialect, and his work was so good and so well liked that it had a powerful influence to fix what is language; that is, to make his writings and his vocabulary models for what is authors who succeeded him. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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