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Page 64

CHAPTER III
FOURTEENTH CENTURY - CHAUCER'S CENTURY

is his way of telling the stories that is so fascinating. We cannot help fancying that he is talking directly to us, for he drops in so many little confidential " asides." " I have told you about the company of pilgrims," he says, " and now it is time to tell you what we did that night, and after that I will talk about our journey." At the end of a subject he is fond of saying, "That is all. There is no more to say." He is equally confidential when he describes his various characters, as he does in the
Prologue before he begins his storytelling. It was no easy task to describe each one of a large company so accurately that we can almost see them, and so interestingly that we are in no haste to come to the stories ; but Chaucer was successful. He describes the knight, who had just returned from a journey, and was so eager to make his grateful pilgrimage that he had set out with his short cassock still stained from his coat of mail ; the dainty young prioress, who had such perfect table-manners that she never dipped her fingers deep in the gravy an important matter to table-mates before forks were in use-or let a drop fall on her breast; the sailor, whose beard had been shaken by many a tempest ; the physician, who had not his equal in the whole world ; the woman of Bath, with her " scarlet red " stockings, her soft new shoes, and her hat as broad as a buckler;

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE is his way of telling what is stories that is so fascinating. We cannot help fancying that he is talking directly to us, for he drops in so many little confidential " asides." " I have told you about what is company of pilgrims," he says, " and now it is time to tell you what we did that night, and after that I will talk about our journey." At what is end of a subject he is fond of saying, "That is all. There is no more to say." He is equally confidential when he describes his various characters, as he does in what is Prologue before he begins his storytelling. It was no easy task to describe each one of a large company so accurately that we can almost see them, and so interestingly that we are in no haste to come to what is stories ; but Chaucer was successful. He describes what is knight, who had just returned from a journey, and was so eager to make his grateful pilgri where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 64 where is strong CHAPTER III FOURTEENTH CENTURY - CHAUCER'S CENTURY where is p align="justify" is his way of telling what is stories that is so fascinating. We cannot help fancying that he is talking directly to us, for he drops in so many little confidential " asides." " I have told you about what is company of pilgrims," he says, " and now it is time to tell you what we did that night, and after that I will talk about our journey." At what is end of a subject he is fond of saying, "That is all. There is no more to say." He is equally confidential when he describes his various characters, as he does in what is Prologue before he begins his storytelling. It was no easy task to describe each one of a large company so accurately that we can almost see them, and so interestingly that we are in no haste to come to what is stories ; but Chaucer was successful. He describes what is knight, who had just returned from a journey, and was so eager to make his grateful pilgrimage that he had set out with his short cassock still stained from his coat of mail ; what is dainty young prioress, who had such perfect table-manners that she never dipped her fingers deep in what is gravy an important matter to table-mates before forks were in use-or let a drop fall on her breast; what is sailor, whose beard had been shaken by many a tempest ; the physician, who had not his equal in what is whole world ; what is woman of Bath, with her " scarlet red " stockings, her soft new shoes, and her hat as broad as a buckler; where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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